Activating a Christian Mindset in Sports

Whether it’s the parents, the coaches, the refs, the fans, or the players themselves, there’s a lot of intensity in private high school sports. Everyone is wanting the same outcome, to win, and they’re willing to do what it takes to make that happen.

Competition drives many of us, but it’s also inherently not the kind of Christian mindset that Jesus would want us to have. Jesus doesn’t teach us to beat others or to put others down, and we certainly don’t want to relish interminably in the attitude that we’re the best — this leaves us thinking others are inferior.

And yet, we’re not wrong for wanting to win the game or score the winning basket. But where’s the balance? How can we do our best at sports and help our team, while also keeping a Christian mindset?

These are some tough questions, but our private high school is here to provide some guidance. High school athletics are an important part of the Resurrection Christian School framework, and we’re proud of our Cougars! Find some advice on how to incorporate Christianity with high school athletics, and find information on enrollment, admissions, and activities at RCS!

Stay Humble

When everyone is telling you you’re a star, it’s all too easy to buy into that mindset. Every single person is so special in the Lord’s eyes, and every single person is unique. Staying humble doesn’t mean cancelling out this fact, it’s just recognizing that you are human, and that God is greater than us all.

As a high school athlete, you can start practicing humility by thinking about what’s something you did well each game or practice, and what’s something you can improve on. The things you do well shouldn’t always be about goals or points, either. Thinking about how hard you worked, how you incorporated your teammates, or how you dealt with a tough call from the ref are all huge things to be proud of.

Similarly, when thinking about things to improve on, consider any attitudes you may have carried throughout the game — towards other players or yourself. Were you too hard on others? Were you talking negatively to yourself? Did you mess up a goal because you weren’t as confident or you didn’t think things through as well as you could have? Staying humble is less about the points you did or didn’t score or the assists you did or didn’t have, and much more about how you approached the game and players as a whole.

Be Forgiving

Refs, like the rest of us, are human, and they will make bad calls. While it’s easy to assume favoritism or purposefully turning a blind eye, the best thing you can do is to forgive and forget. Getting hung up on the plays that could have (or in some instances, should have) been keeps you from growing.

The same attitude applies towards your coaches — trust their judgment, and while you can always ask questions and see what they’re thinking, remember that timing and approach is key. Is your coach more open to a conversation when there’s five minutes left on the clock? Or would they be more willing to sit down with you when you’ve cooled down and it’s not in the heat of the moment?

Finally, be forgiving of teammates and the opposing team, and be forgiving of yourself as well! Sports can breed some major feelings of inadequacy and resentment, and that’s not what it should be about. Jesus teaches us to forgive those who trespass against us — sometimes that person trespassing against us can be ourselves. Hard times and moments happen. Our private high school wants you to always play your best, whether on the court or off, but we also want you to carrying a loving and empathetic attitude towards all whom you encounter.

Reflect on Scripture

Wait, the Bible doesn’t talk about football, right? Not exactly, but there are plenty of relevant teachings from Jesus. When giving the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus mentions things that every athlete could stand to remember:

 

  • Competition: “You have heard that it was said, ‘Eye for eye, and tooth for tooth.’ But I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also.”
    • Takeaway: Every game is a competition, but it’s necessary to treat others with respect.

 

  • Trophies: “Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and vermin destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”
    • Takeaway: Trophies might seem like the most important thing, especially when thinking about what they represent. However, your love of the game should always be your reason for playing.

  • Grit: “You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled underfoot.”
    • Takeaway: Don’t give up! This passage doesn’t mean to be salty, it’s all about being true to yourself and persevering. When tough times happen for you or your team, use them as a way to grow.

 

 

Play to Win, But Play Fairly

No matter what someone else might be telling you, there is never an OK time to cheat. Honesty absolutely pays for itself, time and again. You don’t want to give your team the reputation of one who doesn’t play fairly. Jesus asks that all of us are honest and open in everything that we do. Make sure you uphold this tenet of Christianity when you’re out there on the field — it will ultimately help you, your character, and even your team in the long run.

Accept Losses

When our private high school says “accept losses,” we don’t mean to say that you should just give up regardless of the outcome of the game. Instead, we think that sometimes so much emphasis is put on winning that a loss can feel like the end of the world instead of a moment for growth.

You are going to lose games — but that’s part of how you get better! The LeBron Jameses and Brittney Griners of the world didn’t become some of the best basketball stars of all time because of nonstop wins. Their success is deeply tied to their losses and how they learned from them.

If you treat a loss like the end of the world and a defining moment for you as an athlete and person, you’re not going to get better. You’ll end up feeling pretty stuck and hopeless. If you treat losses like a lesson and an opportunity for improvement, you’ll come away feeling inspired and motivated, and it will absolutely impact your game.

As a private school in Loveland serving elementary, middle, and high school students, Resurrection Christian School is committed to bettering the character and education for every child. We want sports to be fun, exciting, motivating, and a source of wellness. When keeping Christianity in mind, this can all happen. Find out more about our athletic programs and inquire about enrollment today!


Homework Helper: Writing Practice Part I

Writing is an interesting school subject. It’s one of the most subjective areas of academics — everyone has their own style, voice, and even their own handwriting. Being a good writer isn’t just something for the literary elite. Your child will write papers, essays, cover letters, and job applications at all turns in their life, so it’s important to hone in on the basics now.

At Resurrection Christian School, we prioritize all the subjects, but there are always things you can do to help your child out at home. It’s not only a great learning experience for them (and you), it’s a way to stay involved with your child’s academics at our private school, and a way to connect with them.

Take a look at these ways to work on writing practice with your child, and find more information on enrollment for preschool, kindergarten, elementary, middle, and high school throughout our site!

Early Stages: Preschool – First Grade

Writing is just starting at this point for your young one. You don’t need to worry about sentences or perfect spelling yet (you won’t need to worry about the latter writing element for quite some time). These are the years where it’s all about getting the foundation down.

Holding a Writing Utensil

For children at this age, writing can be very challenging. It requires fine motor skills that take time to develop. In general (but not always), boys take longer to develop their fine motor skills than girls — the reverse is true for gross motor skills, like throwing a ball.

At this age, your biggest priority should simply be helping them get used to holding a writing utensil and starting to use it. Drawing and coloring are great ways to practice (and pretty fun, at that!). Try different types of utensils with different sizes, such as thicker markers or pencils, to encourage your young one. They might feel like they have more control when there’s more to grip.

Another thing to note during this time? When your child is first holding something (usually as a toddler), you’ll find out pretty quickly whether they prefer their left or right hand. Give opportunity for them to practice both to see what feels right. Check out this article on ways to hold a pencil for more information!

Practice Tracing

Of course, you want your child to draw freehanded and explore with using writing utensils, especially when they’re young. However, our private school also recommends getting some practice in with tracing lines — this will make it easier to trace letters later on down the road.

By the time your child is getting ready for kindergarten, they should be able to write their first name and the first letter of their last name (capitalized). They should also be able to distinguish between uppercase and lowercase letters, even if they don’t know all their letters yet. In terms of writing, your child should be able to trace letters and write many letters independently.

If your young one isn’t there just yet, there’s no need to panic! You can practice by printing off sheets and resources for parents and teachers from the web, or ask your child’s teacher if they have extra materials for practicing at home.

Writing Words

By kindergarten and first grade, your child will be writing words and simple sentences. You can guide in this practice at home with a number of games:

 

  • Sight Word Match: Make a list of ten sight words (i.e. at, and, on, or, etc.), then have your child copy writing them down in a column on a piece of lined paper. In the other column or on another piece of paper, help them cut out and paste the same sight words that they find in magazines or newspapers. You can also tape or glue the words in a jumbled up order, then have your child draw lines to connect each word.

 

  • Chalk Hopscotch: Create a hopscotch outline, then have your child write words that make a sentence into different boxes. Have them hop in the order of the sentence, have them jump to sight words, or have them jump to words that start with a certain letter.
  • Copycat: This is especially good for kids who need to take their time and slow down on their writing, and need to focus on how they’re holding a writing utensil. You write various words, and then in different colors, have your young one try to copy (either by writing separately, tracing over, or both) the word as neatly and perfectly as possible.

 

 

Keep Reading

Reading and writing are completely intertwined. We can’t be great writers if we’re not great readers, and the reverse is true as well. By encouraging literacy as a whole in your household, you’ll be giving your kids a foundation for writing success.

Read every single day with your young ones, take frequent trips to the library, and talk about the writing that you’re reading. Are there sentences that rhyme? What words make you feel a certain way? If you closed your eyes and listened, could you still picture the story? Engage in a dialogue with reading that revolves around writing, and you’ll set your kids up for success.

Offer Encouragement

There are any number of ways that kids deal with and react to writing. Some might try to write everything perfectly, and get hung up on the spelling of words. Others might get frustrated with the struggle of holding a writing utensil and producing neat words and letters, and might want to give up.

Our private school knows that the best things you can do for your child’s writing practice are to be encouraging, patient, and focus on the big picture. Create a culture in which writing is a messy process, it’s not perfect, and that’s the point of it. Always applaud your child for going the extra mile and persevering through tough tasks.

In our next blog, our private school will cover some of the ways in which you can help your older children with their writing exercises and homework. Stay tuned, and contact Resurrection Christian School for any questions you might have on enrollment, academics, or more.


Homework Helper: Multiplication

If you’ve ever felt confused looking at your child’s homework, struggled to explain a topic that seems easy to know but hard to teach, and dealt with the frustration of homework help, you are not alone. In fact, you’re probably part of the majority!

Helping kids with homework is a challenging task, much more so than it may seem. But more than anything, it’s both commendable and loving that you want to help. Our private school is starting up a blog series called “Homework Helper” to assist families in helping their kids at home. Today’s topic: Multiplication!

Learn more from Resurrection Christian School, and contact us to schedule a tour with our campus!

The Basics

Mastering multiplication might seem like memorizing flashcards, but it goes much deeper than that. If your child doesn’t have a solid understanding of addition, grouping, and counting, they’ll struggle with later multiplication concepts and applications. Having a good mathematical base is the only way your child will truly understand the facts and the times table. Here are some things your child should know before diving into multiplication (and if they’re not there yet, our private school has included things you can try for added practice):

 

  • Grouping: Kids should be able to group objects into equal sets, and should recognize that if they’re trying to count out 20 blocks, it’s faster to grab several at a time.

 

      • Extended practice: Have your child count out objects and ask them if there’s a faster way to do it, then model what you mean (“Is there a faster way to count out 30 pennies?”).

 

  • Group counting: Similarly, your child should be able to count off by numbers: twos, fives, and tens are a good starting point, then go into threes, nines, fours, sixes, sevens, and eights (that exact order might be most beneficial).

 

      • Extended practice: Continue practicing to count everywhere and anywhere — road trips, items at the grocery store, money, etc.

 

  • Number order: Your child should confidently know what number comes before and after a number — ideally up to 1,000.

 

      • Extended practice: Make number line charts and turn it into a guessing game (“I’m thinking of a number that comes after 42 but before 63.”).

 

  • Addition: Your child’s adding skills should be basically flawless — even if it’s not perfect, they have mastered the concept.

 

    • Extended practice: There are countless coloring sheets that are addition-focused, as a fun activity to hone in on the basics. Continuing to ask real life scenarios (“I have four apples and eight grapes. How many pieces of fruit do I have?”) are also beneficial.

The Skill

When your child has mastered the above concepts, transferring their knowledge to multiplication won’t be as hard as you might think. You can reinforce some of the skills they’re learning in the classroom (feel free to ask their teacher for tips!), but here are some other strategies to try:

 

  • Area Method: Draw a rectangle, divide it into the problem at hand to figure out how many squares are present. For example, 3 x 5 would look like a rectangle with three squares drawn on one side and five squares on the adjacent side (like a grid).

 

 

  • Group Method: Draw (or use connecting blocks — Legos work too) groups of numbers to find the total. For the same 3 x 5 example, connect five blocks together, three times, or draw five dots three times. This is a bit more time-intensive, but it might help your child get started with mastering the basics.

 

  • Money: We multiply with money all the time and don’t even realize it! Money is great for mastering the fives and tens tables — five pennies equal a nickel, ten equal a dime, and so forth. Have your child practice converting money (they might be extra motivated if they get to keep a penny or two, too!).

 

The Homework

At some point, memorizing multiplication facts will make their lives so much easier. But rote memorization does not leave much room for expanding in mathematical knowledge and insight. Understanding fractions, division, area, and perimeter are all things that require a sound foundation. If your child is struggling with multiplication homework, try out these methods before jumping into flashcards and memorizing their times tables.

Once they’ve shown they understand how multiplication works, then you can move into memorizing facts. Practicing flashcards, having a times table chart that they get to color in and track every time they master one of their times tables are all things that can help their multiplication progress.

How do I know if they’re ready?

If your child is automatically knowing how to set up an array, sees a multiplication problem and instantly starts drawing out the problem, they most likely know how multiplication works, and are ready for memorizing facts.

But if you’re not sure they’re fully understanding this math concept, you can — first and foremost — always get advice from their teacher or check in with them. There are also tons of online games and videos that you can help your child with.

At Resurrection Christian School, we are committed to helping all children succeed, and we know that so much of a child’s success comes from home. It can be frustrating when you don’t know how to help, but hopefully, these tips have provided you with some further insight. If you have further questions, never hesitate to reach out to our private school! In the meantime, stay tuned for our next Homework Helper blog, and schedule a tour with our preschool, elementary school, middle, and high school today!


The Influence of Communication for Teens – Part 2

Communication is such an important aspect of life. It can be hard to deduce how best to communicate with your child about the importance of being able to express themselves and talk to other people. As the saying goes “it takes a village to raise a child.” Don’t think that the responsibility of showing your child how to express themselves falls entirely on you. RCS is here to help you teach them healthy ways to communicate and why to develop important communication skills. In our previous blog, we explored the risk of not developing communication skills and some ways you might show them how to communicate better. In this entry, we’ll discuss the various aspects of good communication and how it affects all of us in our day-to-day lives.

Benefits of Communication:

Expression is a key benefit of speaking out. While this isn’t always a matter of verbal communication, it’s about being comfortable in your own skin. If your teen loves Doc Martens but feels like they’ll be interpreted in a certain way if they wear those, let them know it’s a sign of expression and they shouldn’t care what people think. Expression is an important part of feeling stable and able to talk about what you feel is important to you. This ensures that your child won’t feel the need to express themselves by dying their hair pink down the road because they don’t feel heard. Instead, they’ll dye their hair pink cause they like pink, or they’ll dye it a flattering color because it promotes their professional goals in life.

Another major benefit of regular communication skills is being able to describe your feelings and understand yourself on a deeper level. If you can describe an experience you can fully understand it. It’s like a reading comprehension question, but in regard to day-to-day life and how they need to be able to handle different situations. By regularly being able to describe a situation, they’ll get better at viewing it objectively and acting rationally rather than based on what their feelings dictate. That goes hand-in-hand with the ability to explain yourself. If you can talk about your values, beliefs and perceptions comfortable you’ll be able to build more open relationships with the people around you. If those surrounding your teen don’t understand your teen, they’ll feel isolated because they are isolated. But that all starts with them. They need to feel confident enough in their communication skills to address their issues in a room and make it so that other people can understand where they’re coming from. That’s the very basis of healthy conflict resolution.

The Ability to Question is Gift

It’s more than being anti-establishment, it’s actually the secret to personal growth. Asking questions doesn’t mean you’re insubordinate to your superiors, it means you seek understanding and you gain a better understanding. If your teen knows why they’re doing something, then they’ll feel happier doing it. People want to know the why behind things so they can rationalize why they have to do it. For example, your teen needs to go to a good school, get a good education and learn how to become a lifelong learner so that they can succeed in the career path they choose. Giving your child the opportunity to communicate first with you equips them to be able to communicate with other people, ask questions and express themselves in a healthy manner so that they feel happier on a regular basis.

Success Is Due to More Than Communication; It’s Due to Education

Having an amazing, private school education that gives you the classical background to communicate concisely and eloquently is the first step any child should take toward success. Whatever path your child chooses for their future career, they need to be equipped to communicate with authority. A classical education can give them the base to explore their world with open eyes and the freedom to speak their minds tactfully. Reach out to RCS, the top rated private school in Northern Colorado to find out more about giving your child the proper building blocks to excel at whatever they try at.


The Influence of Communication for Teens

We know that sometimes it certainly seems easier to just not talk to your teens. They’re combative and nearly always on edge and all those hormones racing through their blood make them into a person that’s not really them. Of course, you want your teenager to be able to talk to when they need you, as you’re their guardian, but establishing that dynamic isn’t always easy. Especially when they’re under layers of stress from feeling unmoored in a world that seems new and unfamiliar every day. Of course, that is an extreme and your teen is hardly a volatile little bottle of poisonous words, hormones and unchecked expectations for the world, they are tumultuous. Understanding how to not let that phase you is part of being a good parent and modeling how to be a good adult to them.

Staying Accessible Is Staying in Their Life

When your teen goes out in the world, you don’t know what they’re doing. You have some idea, certainly, but you don’t know how their studies are going in the sense that you don’t know if they’re actually learning or if they’re developing passions for any of the subjects. You know they’re at school and their extracurriculars, but you don’t know if they’re getting anything out of it unless they’re talking to you. In the worst scenario, not knowing how your child is doing in school and if they’re finding passions in their academics and social activities could put you at a disadvantage when your teen starts displaying any sort of unhappiness or when they need help because you don’t know anything about their life. The key to fostering a relationship like this is avoiding criticism. If your child wants to talk to you about something that happened that day they might have messed up, the answer is not to respond with critique. They won’t see it as you helping them, they’ll see it as you not approving of them and shutting them down immediately.

Communication Is Valuable.

If you have any experience in the workplace, you know that communication is of the utmost importance. Since they are your child, they seek your approval in a way you’ve never sought the approval of your co-workers which makes this communication so much more important. They need a sounding board for everything they’re thinking, feeling, experiencing, wanting and not wanting in their life. At times, they just need to feel like they’re not talking to themselves. In fact, there is some evidence that supports the idea that when teens talk to their parents they develop the skills to speak up for themselves. They become less afraid of presenting their own actual opinions and ideas and more functional adults because of it. People who can communicate well with anyone they come across are noticeably more successful than the people who feel stunted by what others will think of their opinions and how they feel about things. This is a skill that will help your child benefit throughout their life in their social and professional lives.

Developing the Wrong Communication Skills

If your child does not develop these skills, they’ll start to develop a form of communicating that is actually the opposite of verbal communication. They’ll expect people to be able to guess at their emotional state and they will become awkward in social situations, prone to shyness and social invisibility which promotes general isolation in life. This is a hardly a healthy way to communicate. The best way to teach a teenager is to lead by example and talk about how there are benefits to speaking up for yourself. Teenagers are inherently filled with a desire to go against the status quo, so if you tell them to speak up more, they’ll view that as criticism, but if you admire the trait in something like a fictional character that you both like, they might associate that as a role model’s trait and try to emulate it. Try casually pointing out a few of these benefits of speaking out in your everyday lives.

Give Your Child the Right Background

Enrolling your child in private schooling equips them with the eloquence they need to feel comfortable articulating their thoughts openly and tactfully. With experience communicating in class with their peers in an educated and civil way, they’ll be able to learn about communication with you, the parent, as well as with other people in their life. Teach your child the meaning of a classical education. Enroll them in the best private school in Loveland today.


Are Video Games Bad For Your Child?

The current political environment is rather tumultuous. There’s plenty of he said she saids and a variety of other arguments that have proven more and more problematic as time goes by. One of those many controversies includes whether or not video games contribute to the aggressiveness in children. Many people are pointing to the quote from Jay Hull, the Dartmouth University professor who proclaimed in the press release for his newest findings on the matter that: “If your kids are playing these games, these games are having a warping effect on right and wrong or they have a warped sense of right and wrong and that’s why they are attracted to these games.” However, the quote and most of the contents of the study are often taken out of the proper perspective to support this narrative of “games are bad for kids.” In fact, Psychology Today claimed that most of the discussions surrounding the piece have been in regard to the press release for the study, rather than the study itself. They mention specifically that “It turns out that this is just another example of how social science is often oversold to a public without the statistical knowledge to evaluate problematic claims.” So, are video games really bad for your children? How will they affect their future emotional stability, their success and what sort of effect does it have on the work you’ve been doing to help them earn their classical education from a high ranking private school? The proper question is actually probably does it have any sort of effect at all? In short, no.

The Actual Research

Learning to read research papers is something that people spend quite a bit of time on, as in they can get a good portion of a college degree merely learning how to properly read research papers and draw conclusions from data. Thus, hoping to be able to grasp these larger concepts as a layman might prove difficult.  We’re here to help you slog through the strange terms and redefine some previous misconceptions you might have when glancing over a study similar to the one Dartmouth produced. In the Dartmouth study, in particular, conducted something called a “meta-analysis of studies of youth to see to what degree violent video games contributed to physical aggression.” First, that means, they were basing most of their data off of other people’s data which is not the best way to conduct the scientific method, as you know if you’re familiar with it. Additionally, they certainly make you believe that they’re measuring these youths over physical aggression, like serious acts of violence like homicides, fights and aggravated assaults. However, they only used teen’s self-analysis and confession of feelings rather than actual evidence of aggression. They specifically mention asking how they would respond to “If I have to resort to violence to protect my rights, I will” as a statement that indicated elevated aggression. If you were asked that question, would you say that you weren’t willing to protect your rights with violence? Probably not. Does that mean you’re an aggressive individual? Also, probably not.

The Actual Study

For that big claim Dartmouth’s leading professor made, it’s rather shocking in comparison to the data he managed to collect. The study itself even mentions that only 1% of youths self-reported in an increase in feelings of aggression, let alone physical representations of actual aggression. This is actually an example of a quite common phenomenon among social science research. For example, if you ask people if they play “violent video games” and then you proceed to ask them how angrily they’ve broken things, those points of data tend to drift toward each other, but that doesn’t mean that’s an accurate way of pulling this sort of data. It’s like asking someone you’ve never seen if they’re white, if they’ve been around people of another race and then asking them how they feel about that race and assuming that that’s an accurate metric of how is racist and how isn’t. The first set of questions creates a bias toward the response of the second question. Psychologists and other scientists alike have expressed that most of these studies, including this one, does not include any more useful information than a Buzzfeed article which is why they have similar headlines.

Join a Balanced Community in a Private School in Fort Collins

RCS is dedicated to getting to the bottom of things and seeking new knowledge together. With an emphasis on community values, Christian sense of ethics and a classical well-rounded education, we’ve created an exceptional private school experience for you and your child. Check out our carefully crafted curriculum and enroll now to join us in our collective pursuit of knowledge and ways to make our children’s lives better.

 


How to Raise Happy, Strong Children

Being a parent is stressful. You have quite a bit on your plate, but most importantly you need to concern yourself with the most important investment of your life: your child. Your child’s well-being is one of the most important parts of your everyday life and once you have their basic needs covered, your mind will start to wander toward your child’s emotional development. With so many folks online talking about their abusive childhoods and how easy it is to make a small mistake in regard to rearing your child. So how do you ensure you’re raising a child that will be as resilient as they need to be? Start off with always having their success in mind. If they’re enrolled at RCS, you’re probably already on the right track.

They Feel in Control

We’re sure you’ve seen the various Facebook posts about how controlling parents can damage a child’s long-term emotional development. There are some studies to back up this assertion, but they mostly come in the form of encouraging a successful child. The leading parenting expert in the UK, Sue Atkins, claims that adults who are successful felt in control in their childhood. There are also several strong examples of children succeeding based off of strong, close relationships with their close relatives and people they love. If they feel valued and have control over their lives and the direction they’re going in, they’re far more likely to succeed than children who are constantly urged in the opposite direction of the way they want to go. According to the same leading parenting expert extrapolated that children who won’t have much in the way of emotional stability as adults don’t feel connected to others, don’t feel like they count, and don’t feel capable of taking care of themselves. Most importantly, however, is that children have to feel courageous and brave in order to accomplish their goals and be stable as adults.

Why Are These Attributes Important?

Having the above attributes in both children and adults gives us a positive attitude about life. Quite simply put, it gives the whole thing purpose. The idea is that these four basic building blocks that create a sense of security for the child will certainly promote a “Can Do” attitude later in life, which will render them capable of handling the things that life throws at them. The hope is that children with these advantages will become responsible, happy, and self-reliant. Naturally, as a parent, finding these attributes in your child will be a relief. As it means you’ve done your job fundamentally well.

The Stem Is Connection

In most cases, a human’s ability to both survive mentally and physically relies largely on the ability to connect to others. To put it simply, we move from being infants who are totally dependant on others to being interdependent on others, because that streak never quite leaves. With strong connections to the important people in the child’s life, they’ll be able to thrive and feel secure in their endeavors because there’s always something to fall back on.

Foster Connectivity In the RCS Community

The easiest way for you to foster a sense of connection between you and your child as well as help them build a support system of their own starts with creating a community for them. Wouldn’t you want the community to be more centered around Christian values and the love of education and the pursuit of knowledge? Enroll your child at RCS to receive the private school level of education while tapping into a community where your child can feel supported and safe and thrive throughout the rest of their emotional development.


What is a Classical Education?

A classical education is rooted in the idea of training the mind to think critically. This method is supposed to create lifelong learners. As we know, industries change at the speed of light nowadays. If you aren’t a lifelong learner and you’re rather set in your ways, it’s unlikely that you’ll do as well as you can in your career field. As a parent, we’re sure you’re invested in the future of your child and you want them to succeed. If you’re like most parents, you might even go so far as to take some time pondering how exactly you can give your child the right foundational education to ensure that they thrive throughout their whole life. In most cases, we urge you to invest in a well-rounded, classical education like the one we offer at Resurrection Christian School. Our private schooling education makes a difference in our alumni’s lives because we teach a curriculum that encourages a love of learning and knowledge and encourages rather than forces learning. Below, we’ll continue to explore what a classical education is, and how it can benefit your child in it’s teaching structure.

Training The Mind

Do you have a love of reading? How was it fostered? By forcing yourself to read anthologies regarding history and mathematics? Or did it start with something you learned to enjoy? Perhaps it was a piece of classical literature or something similar, but whatever it was, it had the proper effect. Your love of reading has followed you through life and rendered you a more capable individual in all of your interests regarding hobbies or your career. So how do we foster this similar love of learning and pursuit of knowledge in young minds? Through a tried and true three-part process called the trivium. Where traditional classical educations often begin with merely learning the facts a regurgitating it, more modern classical education studies center on creating a love for the learning while still improving the fact so that the child can have a solid foundational knowledge of simple mathematics and language operations before beginning to play with these pursuits.  

The First Portion Of a Classical Education

Uncreative administrators of the classical education view the first portion of a classical education as the “grammar stage.” But if you compare it to the original idea of a classical education, it’s rather unrelated. The original version of a classical education included advanced studies of different languages which would bolster the child’s skills at learning languages later in life and easily and successfully turn them into lifelong learners. Interestingly enough though, one of the main basics of the original classical education, in the sort that kings and queens, as well as higher-ups in the various courts all over the world, learned first was philosophy. The notion was that the child would be able to learn how to apply philosophical ideas to everyday life and have a better handle on human behavior as well as language and interactions than otherwise.

The Grammar Foundation

As important as it is to create a strong foundation for your child’s learning is, the various ways to get there should be acknowledged and analyzed. Our curriculum leaves room for you to interpret how you want your child’s private education, that is in truth a classical education, to proceed. The grammar stage lays the foundation for the rest of your child’s learning, so ensuring that it’s starting out in the way you’d like it to is important. Check out our curriculums for early childhood learning development and feel free to ask RCS questions about our teaching methods and our philosophy surrounding the classical education you’re investing in for your child.

Invest In The Future At RCS

Don’t enlist your child in public school and roll the dice on their education. Enlist your child in a high-quality learning institute that will help you foster a love of knowledge and the desire to always seek more. Start on the right foot starting today. We provide Christian centered, well-rounded education that bolster your child’s chances of success and much more. We’re passionate about sharing knowledge with your child and ensuring that they don’t struggle, but thrive in their academics. Reach out to us now.


Why The Gap Year Might Be Beneficial After Private School- Part Two

If you’re joining us late, be sure to go back and catch the intro to our ideas about the beneficial uses of a gap year between high school and college. As we mentioned in our previous entry, the gap year develops the child’s prefrontal cortex which develops their worldview as well as their personality and rounds them out their expectations of reality.

Financial Relief

One of the major advantages for most kids and their parents alike is the financial hiatus. If you’ve been spending money to give them a classical education for the majority of their life, a financial break might be highly valued for you and also for your child if they’re preparing to go and support themselves at college, even if you’re prepared to pay for their tuition. As more people go to college and get worthless degrees the number of people who have only a pile of student debt to show for their 4-year college degree rises. Kids who feel the need to switch majors in the middle of their college career stretch the costs out, making the whole ordeal more pricey. Studies are finding that a gap year might reduce the number of folks who change their major in the middle of their college career. Gap years are praised for assisting people in deciding what they’d like to study and helping find their passions and what they’re best suited to in a way that unfiltered education cannot.

Diversified Preparation

College is rigorous and while RCS does everything we can to prepare children academically there are a variety of challenges that nothing but real-life experiences can prepare them for. While there are a host of support systems and other channels that Christian private schools provide for children, there is still a cost for going to college too early and that is mainly the taxing nature it takes on a person’s mental health if they’re not prepared. The idea of the gap year is to take kids out of their safe zones and thus improve their self-confidence and help them gain a sense of self and adaptability which can be a powerful skill set to earn before entering college. College environments are full of lack of sleep, constant activity and high levels of stress that past experience in adaptability to a variety of situations will help kids tackle those things like pros so they can focus on the new chapter of their life and what obstacles will help them grow the most as people.

Start Your Child On The Right Foot With Private School

If you share our opinions about education and religious ethics you’d fit in perfectly at RCS. Enroll your student today to give them a well-rounded education that includes Christian values. Reach out to us with any questions or concerns. We’d be happy to talk to you about our private school curriculums and ideals.

 


Why The Gap Year Might Be Beneficial After Private School

Some people go so far as to criticize private schooling at times, mentioning that there is a limited pool of social growth that a child can acquire when they’re submerged in a controlled environment. For several reasons, Resurrection Christian School is careful to push back against those claims, but we can also see how, even through RCS provides a large environment for children to build many social skills with fellow Christians, we understand the need for real-world experience. If, as a parent, you’re more concerned about this valuable outside world experience being cultivated in your child, we have one suggestion that is earning more respect as the years go by: the gap year.

Europe Did It First

Sometimes, Europe is ahead of the curve with certain things and in this case, they certainly are. Germany, the UK, Denmark and even Australia and Israel encourage students who have just graduated to take a gap year in between their studies. This time can be used to travel, serve the church, serve in the military or work before moving on to their college studies. However, the current U.S. climate regards gap years with a collective panic. Surely, if your child takes a gap year, they’re destined to not do as well as others. The growing consensus is that it isn’t quite true anymore. The idea is that if children get a taste for the non-school life they’ll realize how important it is to go back and it will give the privilege of going to college and earning a degree a new glow. In fact, psychologists at large are not worried about kids not wanting to go back to school as many studies done on the subject found that around 90 percent of the kids that take a gap year return to their studies with new fervor. The studies concluded that a very important brain growth period between those two school periods allows for the person to grow socially and within their understanding of the world.

The Simple Science:

While a gap year isn’t for everyone, it has quite a bit of scientific data backing up the benefits for those it catches the fancy of. The prefrontal cortex is continually expanding in the late teen years and it is the section of the brain that develops the child into an adult with an adult personality. It controls your propensity for planning and draws complex conclusions from data. In other words, it’s the largest jump in growth in the form of maturity that your child will see in their lives. Thus, when the gap year comes to a close, they’ll nearly be a different person with a new understanding of themselves and college as a growth opportunity.

Start Your Child On The Right Foot With Private School

Share our opinions about classical education, child growth and ethics? Enroll in RCS this semester.

Catch the continuation of our argument for a gap year on our next blog.