Teaching Your Children Honesty

There are many values that are important to teach our children, values that will help them grow and develop into well-rounded adults. These values include everything from empathy and kindness to perseverance and patience. Teaching your children to behave properly, treat others with respect, and even to have self-confidence can be challenging, but it is important.

One other value that is important to teach your kids is honesty. Being honest can be hard, especially at a young age. But helping your child understand the importance of being honest can help them to grow to be honest teens and adults. Children are able to tell the difference between lying and telling the truth, but whether they choose to tell the truth depends on what you to help them realize the importance of honesty.

We have talked a lot about helping your children learn these important values in life and at Resurrection Christian School, we help to encourage our students to live by these values. While we can help to make your students well-rounded people, it is your job as their parents to teach them the importance of being empathetic, kind, patient, and honest.

In this blog, we will help by giving you tips to teaching your children and teens honesty. Keep reading to learn more and help your kids learn an important life lesson.

Teaching Your Kiddos

Before your children reach their teen years, establishing a sense of honesty can help them to stay on the right track. Honesty should become part of your child’s moral compass, allowing them to understand that telling the truth is the right thing to do.

Children lie for many reasons, whether they are scared of the consequences, afraid to disappoint their parents, or simply know what they did was wrong. But what you need to establish, is a safe place to tell the truth. If they feel worse for telling the truth, it is not likely that they will do it often.

Don’t Label

Calling your child a liar is not something that will help them become more honest. Kids lie for a reason and if you throw a label on that, they may begin to live up to that label. Both babycenter and sheknows mention that calling your child a liar will only make teaching your child about honesty more difficult. Instead, explain to your children that your don’t like lies but that doesn’t change the way you feel about your child.

The babycenter article suggests saying something that give your child a chance to explain why they lied. Try saying, “I don’t like lying, but sometimes we lie because we are afraid we did something wrong.” This will allow your kid to understand that lie is bad, but not make them feel so guilty for their little lie. This gives them a chance to explain to you why they lied and tell you the truth. Letting your child know that telling the truth is the right thing to do, even if what they did was bad, they will begin to develop a sense of honesty.

Don’t Give Them Opportunities

Some things that parents do or ask, give children the opportunity to lie. Asking if your child finished their homework as they are running out the door to play with their friends, is a great example. They are not going to tell you that they haven’t finished and risk not being able to play with their buddies. Instead, ask them to show you their homework when they finish and then they can head outside to play. If they know you are expecting to check up with them and make sure their work is all done, they will not have a chance to lie and they know it. Be sure to check up with them though, if you say it and don’t do it, they will use that knowledge next time to lie and head outside early.

If you set your child up to tell the truth, they will be more likely to tell the truth since you are making it hard for them to lie. While real life situations won’t be as simple to know the right answer, they will have practice telling the truth which will help them to know what to do in situations that aren’t set up for them.

Don’t Let Lies Slide

When your child lies to you, there must be consequences. If you simply say don’t lie and move on, they will not see the negative consequences that come with a lie. But keep in mind that you don’t want your children to feel afraid of the consequences. Like we said before, your child should feel safe about telling the truth, they should know that they will be in less trouble for telling the truth than the were for the lie.

When your child tells the truth, praise them. Thank them for being honest with you and ask them why they lied. Knowing their motive will help you to understand what the problem was and why they were scared to tell you the truth. If they lied about getting a bad grade on a homework assignment because they were scared you would be disappointed, you can let them know that if they ever need help on homework they should let you know so you can help them. If you get mad about the grade and raise your voice at them, they will be more likely to lie the next time as well.

While some punishments may be too harsh and cause your kids to fear telling the truth after they lie, one thing you can do is to help them set it straight. If they did something wrong and lied about it, tell them that they have to make it right. If they took a toy from their friend’s house without their friend knowing, take them to return it to their house and apologize for taking it. Their friend will be happy to get their toy back but may be mad at your child. Tell your child that it was worth telling the truth because the friend was happy that their toy was returned to them, even if they are upset with your child. Tell them you are proud that they chose to tell the truth, it will make them feel better as well.

Teach About White Lies

Teaching your child the difference between lying and little white lies may be challenging, but it is also important. You want your child to be polite rather than blurt something out that may hurt someone’s feelings. Rather than teaching them that it is okay to lie sometimes, teach them to find something nice to say instead of saying a truth that may be hurtful. Teach them the famous saying, “If you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all.” This will help you kids either find something else positive and kind to say, or they will keep their hurtful truth to themselves. This is an easy way to teach your child about white lies without calling them lies and keep your kid honest.

Reminding Your Teens

Even if you teach your younger children to be honest, as they grow into teenagers, they will have more to lie about and more serious things to lie about. Whether your child is usually good at telling the truth or they are known to tell a lie, they will need a reminder about why telling the truth is important.

Lead By Example

One way you can remind your teen that being honest is important is to be honest yourself. If you mess up don’t hide it from your kids or spouse. Tell them the truth and let them know that you made a mistake or did something that they may not be happy with. If it easy to lie, but if you want your children to adopt honesty, you must be honest.

When your teens are around, be sure to model honesty. They will be watching and pick up on your lies, even the little ones. So be sure to stay honest and show them that even if it is hard to tell the truth, it is the right thing to do. This includes what you tell them about lying. If you tell them they won’t get in trouble for telling the truth, don’t punish them when they do.

Don’t Overreact

Teens will often test their parents to see how they react when they tell them the truth. According to an article from the Washington Post, staying calm, curious, and not overreacting can help encourage your teens to tell the truth. If they are honest about their terrible test grade and you lose your temper, they are less likely to be honest about something else that may be more serious. They are gauging your reaction, so try not to react negatively.

Make Punishments Fair

Hopefully your teen is not lying about anything too serious, but if they are the punishment may need to be more serious as well. But for small lies, keep the consequences similar and fair. If they lied about failing a test, take their phone away for the night while they focus on their homework. Fair punishments will help them realize it was wrong to lie but not make them fearful of telling the truth.

Talk It Out

Talking with your teen is effective. They are old enough to have a conversation so show them that you view them as a young adult. Even if it turns into an argument, try to figure out why they have started lying so much, ask how you can help, and communicate why you are upset that they are lying. A conversation may be better than any other tactics.

Teaching your child and teen honesty is important and can help them develop into an adult with values. Use these tips to help teach the importance of honesty and don’t forget to set a good example. At RCS, we help our student learn these important values and more. Take a tour and contact us for more info!


Helping Your Kid With School Transitions

Whether your child is heading into kindergarten or about to start their last year of high school, going back to school can always cause stress and your child may need your support to make the transition. Starting school for the first time is a big change and your little kiddos may be extremely nervous, so helping them prepare will help them immensely. As for your seniors, they will be starting to think about college and their future, and your guidance can help them feel more confident about the choices they make.

Luckily, if your children attend Resurrection Christian School, they will be able to grow throughout the school year with their friends, knowledge of the campus, and a community that will help them through the tough times in school. Our schools start at preschool age and end when your child graduates from high school, giving them the full school experience with a sense of belonging and a large amount of staff support.

While we will help your children as much as possible, you have the ability to help them as well, and we encourage you to do so. Going back to school can be scary, challenging, and overwhelming, and your children need you to help them through this hard time, even if they don’t ask for it.

While you don’t want to hold your child’s hand throughout their entire school career, you should be there for them to help them with problems, stresses, and needs they have. With the 2017-2018 school year starting, you should prepare your kids as well as yourself, be ready to help them when they need it. In this blog, we will go over how to help your children with the transition, help them throughout school, and help them prepare for the next step.

Preschool

If your little ones are finally at school age, you will want to make sure they are prepared and know what to expect before walking into the classroom. They should understand how to behave around others and that they will be learning a lot of different things. We provide them with a safe and caring Christian environment and will be teaching them everything from social development to different academic skills.

To best prepare your child for the year ahead, work with them on several things.

Work with your child on getting along with others. This is an important life skill and will not stop being used after preschool, so the earlier they master this skill, the better off they are. Teach them how to play well with others, share toys, and not interrupt. Have conversations with your kiddo to teach them how to properly address other people. We understand your preschooler is still young and may have trouble holding a conversation, but practice makes perfect! Help your child understand that saying hello and goodbye is polite and work with them on other manners as well. This will help them have an easier time behaving in class and working with other students. Social development is important to work on with young children and can help them develop other important life skills as they grow.

Not only should you help your child develop their life skills, but their academic skills as well. Start introducing them to the alphabet, numbers, colors, shapes, and other things they will be learning in preschool. Working on the alphabet or numbers regularly will help them begin to learn these things, which in turn, will help them excel in class and be ahead of the class. This will help them feel more confident with their abilities and learning will become fun.

Once your child has started school, make sure they are having a good time. We will do this as well, but it is important for you to make sure you child is learning, developing, and making friends. Ask them how their day was. Your interest in their school life will help them get excited to tell you everyday. You could even make a game out of it and tell them that every day they have to tell you one thing they learned, either in class, about a friend, and anything else they can come up with. This will help them get excited about telling you something and may even help them learn some better so that they can tell you all about it.

Your preschooler will be nervous during their first few weeks, but with your support and excitement they will have an easier time and be more willing to go to school everyday. They will most likely end up loving preschool as well!

Elementary To Middle School

Once your child has the hang of things, it will be easier for them to go back to school. It may even become exciting—reuniting with their old friends, meeting new ones, and learning more about their favorite subject will help your child be more prepared when heading back to school.

But making the transition from elementary school to middle school may be a different story. They went from being the oldest in the school to being the youngest, not knowing the building, and having to get used to a new system. Again, luckily for RCS students, they will be able to grow with their friends and will be more used to the different schools on our campus, helping them to feel better walking in the first day.

Help your children prepare by giving them a tour of their new school after getting their schedule. Knowing where their classes are right away can help them feel more confident walking in the first day. Students tend to be more nervous when they are not sure where they are going. You could even help by sketching out a map and marking where their locker is and where each class is.

Help your student with homework, have them teach your something they learned, and get them excited to be part of an older crowd and help them get involved. Being a part of a community at school can help them enjoy their time at school more and will help them feel excited about going to events with their friends.

Since your child has been doing this school thing for a while, they may not act as nervous as they once did, but just know they may be hiding it from you, so be supportive, excited, and help them when they need it.

Middle School To High School

This is a big transition for many students. High school is when grades truly start to matter and they need to start thinking about their future. They have a few years, of course, so don’t stress them out with future talk yet, just let them enjoy their high school experience.

This transition may be difficult for your kiddos, but like we said before, they have been doing this school thing for a while and they will most likely not show their nervousness or stress. Unfortunately, this is the age where kids begin to think they are too cool for their parents, so it is important to make sure you are not pushing them away as well. Let them be a teenager and don’t add stress to their lives. But make a point to show interest in their life. Ask them about their school, what they are learning, about sports they may want to participate in, and whatever else you can get them talking about.

If you can, help them with homework and give them advice when they ask. This is the age when children start becoming a little more independent are rely less on their parents to help them with everything. So if they don’t ask for help on homework, then just ask them to hang out—watch a movie, play a board game as a family, or go for a walk. Spending time with them will be as helpful as anything else and they may just open up to you.

High School To College

This is a scary but exciting transition for you and your kids. If your child is in their last year of high school, start asking them about their future plans. It is never too early to start making plans, applying to colleges, or deciding what they want to do. Helping them through the process will make them feel better and help them stress less. Throughout the year start helping them prepare—assist in scholarship applications, allow them to be independent, and help them finish school strong.

If your child currently just started their first year of college, pray for them and send them care packages. They are on their own now and you have done your job. Call them and answer when they call you. Make sure you are supportive of their choices and show interest in what they are studying. And remind them that there is no rush in choosing what they want to study.

If your child is making a big transition from one school year to the next, they will need your support and love. Show interest in their school work and spend time with them. This is a simple way to get your children excited about school and help them with these transitions.

At Resurrection Christian School, your student could have an easier time with the transitions thanks to the different schools all on one campus. Contact us and schedule a free tour.


Beginning Preparation For College

Although it is still early in the summer, it is never too early to think about how to prepare your teen to go to college. If your kid recently graduated from high school, they are soon to be heading off to the college of their choosing, ready to start the next chapter in their lives. This part of the process should not be difficult—applications have been filled out, decisions have been made, and your student has begun to mentally prepare.

But this is still a hard time. Especially if your kid is going to an out of state school, they will have to learn how to be on their own for the first time. They will have to figure things out on their own, make decisions without parental guidance, and discover their place in this world. Even if your students still have a few years of high school left, this blog will help when the time comes.

At Resurrection Christian School, we work hard to prepare our high school students for college. We work with students to help them get the best ACT and SAT scores they can to help them get into the colleges they want. We use technology courses and different programs to help them learn about the world and prepare them for the future.

But now the preparation is in your hands. Your teen is ready to take that next giant step in their life, and you need to be there for support. Your kid may take a while picking the college that will best suite their future dreams, their personality, and their academic pursuit, but once they make that important decision, you must help them get everything together and be mentally ready for the challenge ahead.

Making the College Decision

Before we dive in, let’s take a moment to help those parents dealing with an indecisive teen. If your kid has yet to decide on the college they want to attend, have a chat with them. Find out what colleges your student is considering and why. If they are considering a school because of a friend, a significant other, or because it has a fun reputation, try to talk to them about why these are not good reasons to be basing their college decision off of.

Teens will be teens, and if you tell them they cannot make decision based on these reasons, they may go against what you say simply to rebel. So, keep it calm, don’t make accusations, and be reasonable. Find out what their interests are and what they may want to study, then look into each school and find out what their best programs are. Finding a school with a great nursing programs may persuade your student to select that school instead of their less desirable choice.

Once the decision is made, it is time to start preparing your student mentally for college. According to Healthline, the sad fact is the one out of four college students suffer from some form of mental illness, 44 percent report signs of depression. So helping your student through this time in their lives could truly make a difference.

Picking a Major Isn’t Major

Of course selecting the right major is important, but it is not something that needs to be done the first semester or even the first year of their college careers. According to the University of La Verne, about 50 to 70 percent of students will change their major at least once, and most change it at least three times.

Stress this point to your child. They may have dreamed about being a historian since their were young, but once they start classes they may find their math classes much more interesting. Remind them that it is okay to be undecided for a while and test the waters, try out classes that they never imagined liking.

Do research on the majors they may seem interested on, declaring could help them out. For example, at Colorado State University, new freshmen can declare a business major right away. But it they hold off only to later decide they want to give business a shot, they will have to get their GPA up to a 3.0 before their can declare. Keep that in mind while researching colleges.

Don’t Force The Major

This is just a small reminder to let your kids live their own lives. If you push your child to be an engineer because your family comes from a long line of engineers, it may end badly. If they don’t like the major or the industry but feel pressured to follow the family, they will end up hating college all together, and may not even have the desire to finish.

Take Time, Save Money

Your teens will want to spend one last summer with their high school friends, but they could be using that valuable time to save another valuable asset: money. Depending on who is paying for college, you will soon learn that it is way more expensive than anything should be, but that is the way it is.

By having your student apply for scholarships, even if they only get a few, they can save a lot of money. The more scholarships, the more money they can save. Although it takes a ton of time, it could truly help their, or your, financial situation in the future and allow them to not take out as many loans.

Have your kid spend a few hours a day applying to scholarships. While they may hate you for it now, they are sure to thank you in the future.

Instill Independence

Most likely, your student will be living in the dorms their freshmen year. This means they will have a certain level of independence they did not have before. They will take care of all their laundry, cleaning, feeding themselves, and whatever else they generally rely on you to take care of.

Many students will get their first job, or a work study, during their first year in college. They will be in charge of their money, and have to decide whether they will save it or not. Teaching them to save at least a portion of their money could help them start building up their account before having to find a place to rent the follow year.

During the summer, start giving your teen a little more independence so they can begin to figure it out. If you keep a close eye on everything your student does and force them to follow your rules until they move out, the transition may be more challenging for them.

Get Ready For Move-In Day

Obviously move-in day won’t be for quite a while, but it is never too early to start preparing. Tell your teen to start planning on what they will bring, what they will need to buy, and what they can buy there. This may also be a good time to have them clean out and throw away old junk they no longer need or want.

When planning on what to pack, remember they will be home for Christmas break, hopefully earlier, and they can swap out summer clothes for winter items during this time. There is no need to bring everything the first time around.

Plan on what they will need once they are in the dorms. Do they have the proper size of sheets? Do they have a laundry basket? Will they need their own cleaning supplies or a shower caddy? Do they need a bike? Will there be room in their dorm for extra seating? Find out the layout of their dorm room and start planning from there. Let them figure out what they will need besides the basics. Decorating a dorm room is half the fun of living in the dorms. Let them enjoy it.

Obviously these are not the only tips that can help prepare your teen for college, and we will go over more as the time draws closer. For now remember these tips and be there for your students. Let them ask questions and answer them the best you can. This is generally a point where teens begin to push away from their parents because they are preparing for a difficult sendoff. Don’t get upset with them for this, help them prepare, and mentally prepare for yourself.

Resurrection Christian School can help get your kids prepared to apply and get into the colleges they want with ACT and SAT prep. If your student is not yet heading to college, make sure they are getting an education that can help them get there. Learn more about Resurrection Christian School today!


Keeping Kids Busy in the Summer

Summer is a great time for students to relax and take a break from their busy and hectic school lives. Depending on the age of your children, their summers may look very different. From playing with friends to getting a summer job, your kids will be focused on things other than their education.

But summer is also a good time for students to get into trouble. If unsupervised and bored, your kids could get mischievous and try finding ways to keep them entertained, and that doesn’t always lead to reading a book in the backyard. There are many ways to keep your kids busy, having fun, and involved this summer.

Preschool

Your young kiddos, who are in preschool or their early stages of elementary, obviously need some kind of supervision. If you are working all summer make sure you hire a babysitter, find a daycare, or have older siblings take responsibilities. In a daycare they will be kept entertained and socializing with friends. If you hire a babysitter or have your older child take care of them, set up things for them to do during the day, things like going to a museum, playing in a park, or hanging out at the pool.

If you are staying at home with your kiddos this summer, or work from home, come up with fun things to do with your kids that will also be fun for you. Go explore some of the nearby mountains, hang out at a waterpark, or attempt to fly a kite in the park. Plan play dates with your kids Resurrection Christian School buddies, let them play together several times throughout the summer, helping to keep their friendship strong.

Elementary

For your kids who are a bit older and no longer entertained by sliding down the slide over and over again, come up with activities that will challenge them and help them test their limits. At this age, kids like challenging themselves and learning new things.

If you believe your child is old enough to stay home alone, make sure they are not just watching TV or playing video games all day. If your kids love books, be thankful, but also take them to the bookstore or the library once a week to get new books to keep them entertained while they are home alone.

Maybe you are not comfortable leaving your child home alone, if this is the case, sign them up for fun summer camps. Find fun and interesting summer camps in Loveland or Fort Collins for your kiddos, let them pick one or a few out so that they will enjoy what they are doing. From soccer camps to game design camps, there is something that will entertain every kid.

Camps are a great way to keep your kid involved, learning, and meeting new friends. On weekends, be sure to spend time with your children, plan fun activities with them that will keep them excited throughout the week. This is a great way to keep them interested.

Middle School

Your middle school aged kids are generally able to stay home alone throughout the summer, but they are also at the age of lounging around all day, playing video games, and using their cell phones as much as their breath.

At this age, you should attempt to get your kids outside and active. Many on the summer camps in the links above are for middle school aged children as well, find something that they are interested in and keep them moving during the summer.

On hot summer days, being outside can be draining. Getting a pool membership could be the solution to getting your kiddos outside and active during the summer. Going to the pool with their friends will keep them active, socializing, and get them away from the technology that rules their everyday lives.

High School

Once your kids get to high school, they believe they should have complete independence and freedom throughout the summer. This is a great time for them to get their first summer job, whether it is at a local coffee shop, retail store, or mowing the neighbors lawns. Getting a job could keep them busy, help teach them responsibility, and allow them to save some money of their own.

If your teens are in any Resurrection Christian School sports, we have many trainings, practices, camps, and open gyms scheduled throughout the summer. Check the calendar to know the times and places.

It is more of a challenge getting your teens to do things that you tell them to do. At this point, when they are staying home alone on summer days, you just have to hope they are staying out of trouble and keeping busy. On weekends try to plan things with them. This is an important time to build a relationship with your teens and help them through their high school years.

Activities for All

If you are a stay at home parent, or are lucky enough to have summers off, spend time with your children. There are many things, especially in Colorado, that you can do to keep everyone entertained and busy during the summer. Go on family adventures into Estes and Rocky Mountain National Park, hike some of the trails, find new places, and get outside.

Head to Horsetooth Reservoir to swim, paddle board, or cruise around in the speed boat. Try to go to all the museums, art exhibits, and the musical and food festivals in Old Town Fort Collins. This is a great area to stay busy in, with mountains to explore, history to learn about, and endless activities, your kids should never get bored.

Have a family volunteering night. Find an organization or cause you would all like to help with and plan a day that you all can do that together. It will help keep you busy, build bonds, and help out the community. Volunteering when your kids are young is a great way to help them find a passion for it, and hopefully continue it in the future.

Keeping your kids busy, entertained, socializing, and working with the community is an important part of summer. Of course lazy days are always acceptable, but when every day turns into lounging around the house and staring at a phone, planning a nice hike or a trip to the museum is the perfect way to make a boring summer day something special.

Resurrection Christian School knows the importance of keeping kids busy and active throughout the summer. We encourage our students to stay involved, keep active, and enjoy their summer. August 15th is the first day of the next school year, enjoy the time you and your kids have together before the hectic school days take over again.