Relationships in High School

Dating is one of the toughest things to navigate in high school. You can feel like an outsider if you’re not in a relationship, you might feel like things are getting too serious too fast, or you might not want to date and feel like there’s something wrong with you.

Our private school is here to tell you that all of these thoughts and feelings are completely normal. See how to work your way through the world of dating in our blog, and parents, check out our admissions page to help your child apply for Resurrection Christian School.

“Everyone is dating except for me…”

First of all, not true! It can feel like that if all your friends are beginning to date, or when you feel kind of awkward and alone at the high school dance (trust us — we’ve all been there). But you’re certainly not the only one who’s single. Even if you were, that’s honestly a good thing.

In high school, you want to have those romantic experiences with others and you don’t want to feel left out. Your parents aren’t wrong when they say “it will happen,” because it truly will. Adults who dated in high school sometimes end up wishing they would have waited. Adults who were single all throughout high school usually have zero regrets. Dating in high school isn’t necessarily bad, but it just goes to show that high school is temporary, and you have your whole life ahead of you to get involved with someone else.

“I don’t want to be inexperienced at dating…”

More specifically, most high schoolers are worried that they’re not going to be good at kissing or other physical stuff. There is so much to say on this topic, it could practically be its own blog. But to start, we’ll say that this feeling is normal. You are not alone for feeling this way, and honestly, it would be kind of strange if at 16, 17, or even 18 you knew exactly what you were doing.

Dating is about getting to know someone, sharing in intimacy, and building and strengthening a connection. The physical side of relationships are important, but they should absolutely come second to the partnership that you are forming. At least, that’s true if you’re wanting to have a lasting relationship.

The point is that everyone is inexperienced at dating at some point in their lives, and when they begin dating a new person, they’ll be inexperienced at dating that person as well. All you can do is listen, learn, reflect, and try your best. And for an additional piece of advice, if you are able to have lasting friendships, through the good and the bad, you’re getting great experience for having a relationship.

“I’m afraid to break up…”

As we mentioned earlier, dating is about getting to know someone and strengthening a connection with them. It’s also about recognizing when something’s not right, and having the courage to acknowledge that being single is far better than being in the wrong relationship.

Far too many people stay in relationships because they’re afraid to be single. Our private school cannot emphasize this point enough: if you’re in a relationship solely because you don’t want to be alone, you are not ready for a relationship, and you probably should spend some time on your own.

Think about it this way — would you rather be with someone who’s not right for you, or wait for someone who is? People talk about “dating to marry” and while that sentiment is admirable and there’s a lot of truth to it, you shouldn’t force something, especially not for the wrong reasons.

Dating is all about learning more about yourself and what qualities in another person are important to you. It’s a process and a learning experience, and breakups happen to nearly every person on the planet. Very few people look back at their breakup and wish it had never occurred — nearly everyone ends up thankful that it happened, because it happened for good reason.

“I’m not interested in dating…”

Not wanting to date people? There’s nothing wrong with that either, regardless of what other people might tell you. Maybe you want to focus on school and your friends, maybe you’re not interested in anyone at your school, maybe you have no desire to date whatsoever. All of that is completely fine.

If you met someone who didn’t like mac ‘n’ cheese, you might think it’s shocking or strange for a second, but otherwise wouldn’t really care. Dating’s the same way — just because some people are all about it doesn’t mean you have to be. Plenty of people go their whole lives without dating someone or having a serious relationship — it’s not unusual! A relationship can be immensely fulfilling and enriching, but you can (and should be able to) have a fulfilling life without one.

“I don’t know how to ask someone out…”

Here’s the thing about asking someone out (and romantic gestures in general): if the other person is into you, they’re going to say yes. If they’re not into you, they’ll (hopefully) say no. It might seem like a gamble, but either outcome is a good one. Even if you hear “I’m not interested,” at least you know! Pat yourself on the back for being courageous, be respectful and thank them for their honesty, and move on.

In order to ask someone out, however, you should probably work towards having some kind of connection with them first so that you can get to know them, see if they’re still someone you’re interested in, and to gauge how they’re feeling. Super important to note: gauge how they’re feeling, not how you want them to feel.

Additionally, make sure you’re being authentic. If you’re asking a bunch of people out for the sake of trying to be somebody, regardless of who it is, you’re probably going to hear a lot of nos (as you should). If you’re truly interested in the person and think there’s a chance they feel the same, go for it!

Trust us at RCS when we say that dating can be rough, and in high school especially, the road can be a rocky one. Our private school knows that dating and relationships feel like the crux of existence for many high schoolers, but we’re here to let you know that there are so many other important things to focus on right now. Spend time with your friends and make memories with them. Work on your grades and get involved at our private school. Start investing and planning into your future, thinking about life after high school. The dating stuff will fall into place when it’s time.

Interested in having an amazing high school experience that prepares you for college and beyond? Look into enrollment with our private high school in Loveland today, and get set for the upcoming school year! We look forward to hearing from you.


Activating a Christian Mindset in Sports

Whether it’s the parents, the coaches, the refs, the fans, or the players themselves, there’s a lot of intensity in private high school sports. Everyone is wanting the same outcome, to win, and they’re willing to do what it takes to make that happen.

Competition drives many of us, but it’s also inherently not the kind of Christian mindset that Jesus would want us to have. Jesus doesn’t teach us to beat others or to put others down, and we certainly don’t want to relish interminably in the attitude that we’re the best — this leaves us thinking others are inferior.

And yet, we’re not wrong for wanting to win the game or score the winning basket. But where’s the balance? How can we do our best at sports and help our team, while also keeping a Christian mindset?

These are some tough questions, but our private high school is here to provide some guidance. High school athletics are an important part of the Resurrection Christian School framework, and we’re proud of our Cougars! Find some advice on how to incorporate Christianity with high school athletics, and find information on enrollment, admissions, and activities at RCS!

Stay Humble

When everyone is telling you you’re a star, it’s all too easy to buy into that mindset. Every single person is so special in the Lord’s eyes, and every single person is unique. Staying humble doesn’t mean cancelling out this fact, it’s just recognizing that you are human, and that God is greater than us all.

As a high school athlete, you can start practicing humility by thinking about what’s something you did well each game or practice, and what’s something you can improve on. The things you do well shouldn’t always be about goals or points, either. Thinking about how hard you worked, how you incorporated your teammates, or how you dealt with a tough call from the ref are all huge things to be proud of.

Similarly, when thinking about things to improve on, consider any attitudes you may have carried throughout the game — towards other players or yourself. Were you too hard on others? Were you talking negatively to yourself? Did you mess up a goal because you weren’t as confident or you didn’t think things through as well as you could have? Staying humble is less about the points you did or didn’t score or the assists you did or didn’t have, and much more about how you approached the game and players as a whole.

Be Forgiving

Refs, like the rest of us, are human, and they will make bad calls. While it’s easy to assume favoritism or purposefully turning a blind eye, the best thing you can do is to forgive and forget. Getting hung up on the plays that could have (or in some instances, should have) been keeps you from growing.

The same attitude applies towards your coaches — trust their judgment, and while you can always ask questions and see what they’re thinking, remember that timing and approach is key. Is your coach more open to a conversation when there’s five minutes left on the clock? Or would they be more willing to sit down with you when you’ve cooled down and it’s not in the heat of the moment?

Finally, be forgiving of teammates and the opposing team, and be forgiving of yourself as well! Sports can breed some major feelings of inadequacy and resentment, and that’s not what it should be about. Jesus teaches us to forgive those who trespass against us — sometimes that person trespassing against us can be ourselves. Hard times and moments happen. Our private high school wants you to always play your best, whether on the court or off, but we also want you to carrying a loving and empathetic attitude towards all whom you encounter.

Reflect on Scripture

Wait, the Bible doesn’t talk about football, right? Not exactly, but there are plenty of relevant teachings from Jesus. When giving the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus mentions things that every athlete could stand to remember:

  • Competition: “You have heard that it was said, ‘Eye for eye, and tooth for tooth.’ But I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also.”
    • Takeaway: Every game is a competition, but it’s necessary to treat others with respect.
  • Trophies: “Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and vermin destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”
    • Takeaway: Trophies might seem like the most important thing, especially when thinking about what they represent. However, your love of the game should always be your reason for playing.
  • Grit: “You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled underfoot.”
    • Takeaway: Don’t give up! This passage doesn’t mean to be salty, it’s all about being true to yourself and persevering. When tough times happen for you or your team, use them as a way to grow.

Play to Win, But Play Fairly

No matter what someone else might be telling you, there is never an OK time to cheat. Honesty absolutely pays for itself, time and again. You don’t want to give your team the reputation of one who doesn’t play fairly. Jesus asks that all of us are honest and open in everything that we do. Make sure you uphold this tenet of Christianity when you’re out there on the field — it will ultimately help you, your character, and even your team in the long run.

Accept Losses

When our private high school says “accept losses,” we don’t mean to say that you should just give up regardless of the outcome of the game. Instead, we think that sometimes so much emphasis is put on winning that a loss can feel like the end of the world instead of a moment for growth.

You are going to lose games — but that’s part of how you get better! The LeBron Jameses and Brittney Griners of the world didn’t become some of the best basketball stars of all time because of nonstop wins. Their success is deeply tied to their losses and how they learned from them.

If you treat a loss like the end of the world and a defining moment for you as an athlete and person, you’re not going to get better. You’ll end up feeling pretty stuck and hopeless. If you treat losses like a lesson and an opportunity for improvement, you’ll come away feeling inspired and motivated, and it will absolutely impact your game.

As a private school in Loveland serving elementary, middle, and high school students, Resurrection Christian School is committed to bettering the character and education for every child. We want sports to be fun, exciting, motivating, and a source of wellness. When keeping Christianity in mind, this can all happen. Find out more about our athletic programs and inquire about enrollment today!


Homework Helper: Writing Practice Part I

Writing is an interesting school subject. It’s one of the most subjective areas of academics — everyone has their own style, voice, and even their own handwriting. Being a good writer isn’t just something for the literary elite. Your child will write papers, essays, cover letters, and job applications at all turns in their life, so it’s important to hone in on the basics now.

At Resurrection Christian School, we prioritize all the subjects, but there are always things you can do to help your child out at home. It’s not only a great learning experience for them (and you), it’s a way to stay involved with your child’s academics at our private school, and a way to connect with them.

Take a look at these ways to work on writing practice with your child, and find more information on enrollment for preschool, kindergarten, elementary, middle, and high school throughout our site!

Early Stages: Preschool – First Grade

Writing is just starting at this point for your young one. You don’t need to worry about sentences or perfect spelling yet (you won’t need to worry about the latter writing element for quite some time). These are the years where it’s all about getting the foundation down.

Holding a Writing Utensil

For children at this age, writing can be very challenging. It requires fine motor skills that take time to develop. In general (but not always), boys take longer to develop their fine motor skills than girls — the reverse is true for gross motor skills, like throwing a ball.

At this age, your biggest priority should simply be helping them get used to holding a writing utensil and starting to use it. Drawing and coloring are great ways to practice (and pretty fun, at that!). Try different types of utensils with different sizes, such as thicker markers or pencils, to encourage your young one. They might feel like they have more control when there’s more to grip.

Another thing to note during this time? When your child is first holding something (usually as a toddler), you’ll find out pretty quickly whether they prefer their left or right hand. Give opportunity for them to practice both to see what feels right. Check out this article on ways to hold a pencil for more information!

Practice Tracing

Of course, you want your child to draw freehanded and explore with using writing utensils, especially when they’re young. However, our private school also recommends getting some practice in with tracing lines — this will make it easier to trace letters later on down the road.

By the time your child is getting ready for kindergarten, they should be able to write their first name and the first letter of their last name (capitalized). They should also be able to distinguish between uppercase and lowercase letters, even if they don’t know all their letters yet. In terms of writing, your child should be able to trace letters and write many letters independently.

If your young one isn’t there just yet, there’s no need to panic! You can practice by printing off sheets and resources for parents and teachers from the web, or ask your child’s teacher if they have extra materials for practicing at home.

Writing Words

By kindergarten and first grade, your child will be writing words and simple sentences. You can guide in this practice at home with a number of games:

 

  • Sight Word Match: Make a list of ten sight words (i.e. at, and, on, or, etc.), then have your child copy writing them down in a column on a piece of lined paper. In the other column or on another piece of paper, help them cut out and paste the same sight words that they find in magazines or newspapers. You can also tape or glue the words in a jumbled up order, then have your child draw lines to connect each word.

 

  • Chalk Hopscotch: Create a hopscotch outline, then have your child write words that make a sentence into different boxes. Have them hop in the order of the sentence, have them jump to sight words, or have them jump to words that start with a certain letter.
  • Copycat: This is especially good for kids who need to take their time and slow down on their writing, and need to focus on how they’re holding a writing utensil. You write various words, and then in different colors, have your young one try to copy (either by writing separately, tracing over, or both) the word as neatly and perfectly as possible.

 

 

Keep Reading

Reading and writing are completely intertwined. We can’t be great writers if we’re not great readers, and the reverse is true as well. By encouraging literacy as a whole in your household, you’ll be giving your kids a foundation for writing success.

Read every single day with your young ones, take frequent trips to the library, and talk about the writing that you’re reading. Are there sentences that rhyme? What words make you feel a certain way? If you closed your eyes and listened, could you still picture the story? Engage in a dialogue with reading that revolves around writing, and you’ll set your kids up for success.

Offer Encouragement

There are any number of ways that kids deal with and react to writing. Some might try to write everything perfectly, and get hung up on the spelling of words. Others might get frustrated with the struggle of holding a writing utensil and producing neat words and letters, and might want to give up.

Our private school knows that the best things you can do for your child’s writing practice are to be encouraging, patient, and focus on the big picture. Create a culture in which writing is a messy process, it’s not perfect, and that’s the point of it. Always applaud your child for going the extra mile and persevering through tough tasks.

In our next blog, our private school will cover some of the ways in which you can help your older children with their writing exercises and homework. Stay tuned, and contact Resurrection Christian School for any questions you might have on enrollment, academics, or more.


The Secret to a Well Rounded Education

If you’re pondering enrolling your child in private school, you’re probably aware of the value of being a learned individual in the 21st century. In fact, for the past hundreds of years, being someone with plenty of book smarts, and being equipped with a whole, well-rounded education is an advantage that can’t be matched by much. Setting your child up for life includes a myriad of things, like saving for college, teaching them moral obligations, but it also comes with more subtle lessons and tasks. Sometimes, instead of being able to derive some of the most important lessons from various texts, you’ll need to employ experience. As a parent, there’s a whole host of ways that you can access experiences for your child to partake in. For culture and other finer things can only be appreciated after you’ve fostered an appreciation for the ideas of them. Architecture isn’t stunning if it seems commonplace to your child.

The Power of History

To form our ideals of a well-rounded education, we’ve included the study of Christian religions, and the includes the things that bolstered the Christian religion like an acknowledgment of the hardships of yesteryear and how far and long the good book has traveled to be a scripture to this day. Encouraging a sense of awe for how many years the scripture has survived can begin by encouraging an appreciation for the other accomplishments from human-kind. The best way you can combine the principles of awe in regard to our accomplishments as well as create new experiences for your child is travel. There’s nothing quite like going to a new and completely different place to help you really get a sense of how other people live and how their culture formed as opposed to our own. We’ve collected some of our favorite locations to visit to improve your child’s view of history and the incredible expanse of years between us and the monuments that miraculously still stand today.

Rome, Italy

It’s certainly something to seethe birthplace of the Christian religion as well as the birthplace of modern civilization. Rome is home to buildings that are painted the colors of the sunset, with little, rough-hewn cobblestones that are interrupted by little green sprouts that poke up between each cobble. The buildings are all decorated with carved angels, crown molding painted crisp eggshell white and columns with holes drilled into the stone to extract the ancient Roman’s extra support metal that went through the center for more industrial purposes over the centuries. You can peer at the huge chariot ring, with huge modern and ancient buildings built up around its rim, with a gorgeous carved fountain browning the center of the arena and some remainder of the old stadium seating lingering at the elongated curve on either edge. You can walk among the seats of the Coliseum and see the stone crumbling from thousands of years of weathering and use. Pass through catacombs filled with bones and prayers from long-dead lips carved into the walls near the crypts. You can even peer over certain railings along the sidewalk and look down into the depths of what the city once was, as Rome has rebuilt itself on the remains of its old buildings from its start. You can peek through years of history and watch the city evolve through layers, now covered with moss and foliage, but still visible. It’s a stunning area, and the mixture of modern culture in tandem with the undertones of thousands of years of history makes a culture that’s entirely unique from ours.

Beyond the Scenery

Once you get past the surface beauty of such a remarkable place, it’s still a perfect opportunity for your child to get the experiences they need to earn that well-rounded education you’re hoping they’ll have by the time they’re an adult. With the additional knowledge that they can gain from their experiences at Resurrection Christian School, they’ll be able to form opinions about the history they’re walking through. They’ll be able to appreciate the Borgia apartments when they tour the elaborate frescos within the walls of the Vatican as well as marvel at how well the Catholic church has managed to preserve hundreds of years of history for mankind. They’ll get to observe piazzas from ancient Rome that have completely encased and preserved by the Vatican as well as the magnificent art from renaissance artists that have managed to survive for the past 600 years because of the marvel of organized Christianity and an appreciation for humans as they are made in God’s image and love the joy of creation.

The Difference Between Text and Experience

Seeing pictures is never enough in regard to the wonders of art and architecture and human creation. Experience is far preferred and while there are little wonders to be experienced in everyday life, the real privilege comes into play. There are amazing things to be seen in your local area, but the culture and history we have access to is nothing in comparison to what the literal birthplace of Christianity has to offer. From tiny tiled mosaics to subway stations full of bustling people and so much more. If we were to recommend a real bonding experience that can double as a way to put your child’s world education above and beyond, we’d recommend Rome, Italy.

Set The Right Foundation

Rome has been around for so long because the foundation that men like Caesar and Constantine laid for the city. Set the right foundation for your child by investing in their education from the very start. At Resurrection Christian School, we’re interested in providing our students with the sort of education that creates well-prepared adults who are cultured, well-advised and have the proper idea of who God is in their life. Reach out to us to find out more about enrollment opportunities and more now.


Reinforcing Important Values During The Summer Months

If you have your child enrolled at our Christian school in Loveland, you get to enjoy the benefit of having important values reinforced daily in the classroom in your child’s life. Values — such as honesty, kindness, compassion, humility, and more — are all a major component of their day-to-day studies. When school lets out for the season, the emphasis on these values doesn’t need to stop.

Check out these tips, which will help you continue to reinforce important values in your child’s life during the busy summer months ahead.

It Starts With Your Example

If you want your kids to follow a certain set of values, you have to start by setting the right example. For instance, if you want your kids to value honesty, you should ensure you demonstrate this value in your day-to-day life. Make sure that what you do at work is done honestly. Show them that honesty is important by always dealing with them with integrity. If you lie to your boss or lie to a friend, your kids will see this and will follow suit. Kids are much more likely to listen to your actions than to your words.

Start each day by asking yourself what values you want your kids to take away from that day. Then keep those values top of mind while you go about the day. Use every chance you can to lead by example, instilling important values through your own actions. If you slip up and realize you did something that went against your values, don’t brush it under the rug. Use this as a teaching experience. Apologize to your kids for not setting the right example and make things right with anyone else involved. This will help your kids understand that everyone makes mistakes but it is how we handle those slip-ups that defines who we are.

Choose Clubs & Organizations In Line With Your Values

During the summer, your kids will benefit from joining different clubs and organizations. From summer sports to nature groups to other organized activities, make sure the groups they join help reinforce the values you want them to learn.

The right clubs and organizations will go a long way in helping instill the values you care about. For example, a sports team that emphasizes integrity in their actions will continue to teach your child about the importance of acting with character in any situation. Find groups that align with your values and sign your kids up for activities.

Take Time Together As A Family

While your example will be the number one way you express your values to your children, taking time to gather as a family and discuss important values is also meaningful. If you have a family meal once a day, use that time to talk about a different value each week. One week you might focus on the importance of kindness. You can encourage your kids at your daily family meal to talk about what kindness looks like, how it can be enacted, and how it can become a part of each family member’s character.

Make sure you open up these conversations for questions as well. If your kids have pushback about a value you present, don’t react with judgment and defensiveness. Instead, hear out what they have to say and allow them to ask questions. The only way a value will become their own is if they think it through and question it on their own.

Celebrate Wins

Finally, throughout the summer, take the time to celebrate times when your kids demonstrate a trait you value. For example, if your youngest took the time to share their new toy with a friend, celebrate as a family with a special treat and talk about how important kindness is and how they expressed that through their actions. Perhaps your teenager took the high road with friends and refused to take part in an activity that would have compromised their integrity. Celebrate with them by taking them out for a special meal one-on-one and reinforcing how proud you are of who they are becoming.

Positive reinforcement is the best way to continue to instill values in your children throughout the entire year. Just because the school season has concluded for the summer doesn’t mean learning should conclude as well. Here at Resurrection Christian School, we are passionate about passing on important values to your children when they attend our Christian school in Loveland. Learn more by booking a tour of our facilities today.


Creating Open Lines Of Communication With Your High School Student

High school can be a wonderful time during which you watch your child transition from adolescent to adult. It can also be a challenging time of change for your child as they navigate the complex waters of teenagehood. The best thing a teenager can have in their life during the highs and lows is a parent who is involved and that they feel comfortable talking to about their day-to-day life.

If you are working to create stronger communication between you and your high school student, we are here to help. At Resurrection Christian School, we encourage parents to play an active role in the development of their high school student. Read on to learn more about how you can create open lines of communication with your high school student.

Always Have Time

In order for your high school kid to feel comfortable approaching you to talk about their struggles and celebrations, they need to know you have time for them. If you are always in a rush and constantly on the go, it might be hard for your child to approach you.

Make sure you carve out time specifically set apart for your high schooler. During this dedicated period of time, you can ensure your child knows you are there to listen and engage with them and only them. Turn off your work phone, cellphone, and any other distraction. You can use this time to go out together, to enjoy a meal they like, or to take a hike. However you spend this time, the goal is to ensure your child knows they come before your busy schedule.

Not only should you dedicate some time each week to engage one-on-one with your high schooler, you should also make it clear that any time of any day, they are your priority. Always have time for communication.

Be Patient And Practice Empathy

High school can be a confusing period. Many kids go through some pretty steep ups and downs. Their body is changing, their hormones raging, and their mood can swing from high to low in no time at all. While it can be frustrating to deal with teenagers in certain moments, always practice patience and empathy when you are communicating with them.

If you express anger and judgment, your high schooler will stop turning to you when they need to talk about their life. When you find yourself frustrated with their actions, attitude, or decisions, take the time to calm down before you talk to them. Try to remember what it was like to be a teenager and empathize with the changes they are going through.

Above all else, your teen wants to be respected and treated with dignity. Make sure you are expressing your love for them, even during the difficult times.

Make Listening A Priority

It is human nature to want to do the majority of talking and teaching, without taking the time to fully listen. Make sure that when your child comes to you to talk about their life, you stop to listen. Not only is listening important so that they feel heard, it is also setting an example to your teenager about how communication works. If you find that you constantly are battling to talk over each other, make listening a new priority.

Let your high schooler know that you want to improve on listening to them and set the example by following through.

Know When To Apologize

Just because you are the parent, doesn’t mean that there aren’t times you were at fault. When you realize you have made a mistake, handled communication poorly, or hurt your teenager, have the humility to apologize. The best leaders are those who lead humbly with an open heart.

Take the time to recognize when you were in the wrong and express your apology to your child.

Keep Things Consistent

For many teens, high school is a confusing time. When your teenager has a constant barrage of inconsistent messaging, they can quickly become isolated from you. This is not only damaging to your relationship but also potentially dangerous if they should wind up in trouble and seek advice from the wrong place.

Keep things consistent in their life. Make sure the messaging they hear across the board encourages them to have a strong and honest relationship with you. Consider enrolling them in a private high school in Loveland that will reinforce the same values you teach at home. Consistency goes a long way in helping your teenager navigate high school smoothly. Here at Resurrection Christian School, we place a high value upon the family unit and always encourage our students to seek out the advice of their parents. If you are interested in enrolling your high schooler into a private school, we encourage you to book a tour at our facility today.

By building open lines of communication between you and your teen, you can ensure their safety and well-being as they transition from child to adult.

 


The Benefits of a Summer Job For High Schoolers

Summer is a great time for your children to take a break from school, relax, and spend time with their friends and the family. Giving your child a break from school and allowing them to spend the summer having fun is a good way to help them not get burnt out. But as your children get older, you may want to consider encouraging them to get summer jobs.

While having your high schooler get a summer job may come with some hassles, it could help them in many ways and allow them to make some money of their own. Summer is a great time for kids to relax and spend time doing things they love, but a summer job may be even more beneficial for your teenager than you may imagine.

Your high schooler may be against getting a job at first, but once they realize how great making their own money is, they may actually enjoy their summer job. At Resurrection Christian School, we believe that students should work hard and push themselves to become better each year. A summer job will allow your high schooler to stop relying on you for money and help them learn many different skills and lessons as well.

In this blog, we are going to go over some of the benefits offered to teenagers who receive summer jobs and how they can learn and grow from these jobs. Read on and start helping your high schooler apply for their summer jobs!

Money Management

Giving your children money from time to time is something every parent does. You want your kids to be able to see movies with their friends, get lunch, and buy some things that they need, but you also don’t want to be their own personal bank. Having your teen get a summer job will allow them to make money of their own and can teach them a thing or two about money management.

As your teen start earning money, they will also realize how quickly it can be spent. Once your teen gets a summer job, bring them to the bank to set up a bank account, if they don’t have one already. Allow them to spend their money as they please but encourage them to save some, maybe half of each paycheck. This will allow them to start their savings account off strong and keep it growing all summer long.

Remind them that their savings can help them with many different things. If you are the parents who make your child buy their first car on their own or at least help pay for it, this money they are saving can help them get there sooner. It could also help them once they get to college, whether they use it to pay off some of their college funds or use it to pay for food while they are in school and cannot work as much.

Sense of Value

When your teen is spending your money, they do not really gain a sense of value and assume everything can easily be purchased and replaced. But when they have their own money and buy their own items, they are more likely to take care of it and value it. Take a car for example. When your teenager finally saves up enough money to buy their first clunker of a car, they will be so proud. Rather than being ungrateful for not getting a brand new car, they will cherish their car because they worked hard for it and bought it with their hard earned money. This puts value into a car. They may even drive safer and follow the rules of the road. Making their own purchases can help them see value in the things they purchase, and allow them to make smarter purchases.

Responsibility

Not only will your teenager learn a thing or two about money management and understand the value more, they will also learn responsibilities. According to Pocket Sense, students who get summer jobs tend to do better in school. Your teen will learn the importance of being on time, working hard to complete their job, and doing what is asked of them. High schoolers will learn how to act like responsible adults during their summer jobs and realize why it is so important to take this seriously. They will learn time management and will act more mature and responsible thanks to their summer jobs.

Confidence Boost

Having a summer job can help teens feel more confident in themselves. Applying and interviewing for jobs can be nerve racking, but when your teen lands a job and learns how to do the job, they will feel more confident in themselves and have a high self-esteem. Getting a summer job and making their own money will also help them feel proud of themselves and act more confidently about their abilities.

Gain Skills

When your teen starts applying for colleges and other jobs, having experience and different skills to add to their resumé can help them land a more advanced job and even help their chances of getting into their ideal college. Gaining different skills and learning how to do a job the best way can help your teen in many different ways. Your high schooler will learn important skills like time management, how to deal with difficult customers, how to complete tasks efficiently, and so much more. They will even develop better problem solving skills and how to deal with constructive criticism.

Meet New People

While your high school likely has a ton of friends from school, meeting people in other areas of their life is beneficial. When your kid gets s summer job, they will be working with other people and become friends with these coworkers. They will learn how to be a team player and work with other people to achieve the desired outcome. Being able to work well with others is an important skill to have throughout life and this is a great place to get them started. At Resurrection Christian School, our students are with the same group from kindergarten until they graduate from high school. While this allows for friends to become close and our students to all know each other, it also can be limiting. A summer job will allow your teen to meet people from other schools and make friends with people all across Loveland and Northern Colorado.

More Productive Free Time

When your teen is working during the summer, they will spend their free time more wisely. If they didn’t have a job, how much of their summer would they spend sitting on the couch watching Netflix? During their free time, they will want to get outside, spend time with their friends, and be more productive.

Summer jobs are great for many reasons, while your student may not care about skills, they are sure to love the money they will be making for themselves. At Resurrection Christian School, we know that your kids want a break, but we also know how beneficial summer jobs can be for teenagers. Encourage your teen to pursue a summer job. You can start by helping them get their resumé together and driving them to interviews! Contact us today to learn more about our school.


How to Help Your Child Deal With Bullying

When we picture our children going to school, we like to image them walking down the halls, talking to their friends, joking around with their teammates, being respectful to teachers and other school faculty. We picture a supportive, caring community that helps your children thrive and feel accepted.

Unfortunately, this is not always the case. Bullying is one thing that happens in too many schools across the country. It is not easy finding out that your child is being bullied, it is also not easy finding out the opposite, that your child is the bully. As hard as teachers, staff, members, parents, and peers try to prevent bullying and help those being bullied, it still happens.

At Resurrections Christian School, we work hard to make sure bullying doesn’t become an issue. Our school’s mission, beliefs, and setup help us to create a community that is caring, loving, and supportive. Since our school begins with preschool and ends with high school, our students grow up together, get to know each other, and become one community. Our weekly chapels, bible classes, and Christian mindset help our school maintain a positive and caring environment and help our students learn to treat everyone with respect.

We want our students to feel safe and comfortable at our school and on our campus. We do our part, now it is time to do yours. Talking to your children about bullying is a great place to start. It doesn’t matter if your child is being bullied, is the bully, or is just an innocent bystander. Every parent should talk with their children about bullying, even if they don’t talk to you about it first.

Are you not sure how to talk to your kids about bullying? In this blog, we will go over some tips to talking to your children about bullying and how to do it most effectively. Read on for more tips and help us end bullying.

Figure Out How to Talk to Your Children

Talking to your children may be difficult. Kids don’t always like to open up to their parents, tell them what is going on, or ask questions about anything that may be hard to talk about. In an Insider article, Jim Jordan, who is the president of reportbullying.com, gave some advice on how to talk to your children and how to figure out the best way to do so.

Jim Jordan mentions that there are three categories when it comes to talking—talking about ourselves, talking about others, and talking about objects and events. Out of these three categories, he mentions that most children hate talking about themselves and their own problems. Talking about others, events, or objects can help your child open up to you and actually talk rather than giving one word answers. Figuring out which way is best to talk to your kids is the hard part, but once you figure out what opens them up the most, you will be able to talk to them about many different things.

Take it Seriously

Bullying is a serious issue and you should never blow it off if your kids talk to you about it. Often times, parents will tell their children to toughen up, ignore the problem or person bullying them, or that the bullying will end eventually. These are things your child does not want to hear, especially after opening up to you about being bullied. Unfortunately, bullying can lead to something worse, so taking it seriously when you’re first told about it or when you first notice something is different can help your children.

Talking About Bullying

If you notice that your child is acting differently, skipping activities they used to love, avoiding school, or no longer hanging out with friends, it may be a sign that they are being bullied. If your child isn’t sleeping well, isn’t eating, avoids certain situations, and has become moodier, bullying may be the cause. When talking to your children about bullying, you don’t want to jump straight to the point. An article from Kids Health, suggests using different opportunities to start talking about bullying, such as a TV show that shows some instance of bullying. You can ask your children what they think about what is happening, what they would do in this situation, and maybe even go as far as to ask them if anyone gets bullied at their school. These questions and this discussion may help them open up to you about their situation and feel more comfortable about the topic.

Even if your child is not showing signs of being bullied, talk to them about the seriousness and tell them that you are always there to listen and help them if anything does happen. Tell your children that if they begin to be bullied or notice someone else being bullied, they need to tell someone, whether it is a parent, teacher, another adult, or a peer. Getting your kids to understand that you will help them and support them through this time can allow them to feel more comfortable if anything does happen.

Dealing With It

Talking to a school principal, a teacher, or a counselor at the school can help get eyes on the situation and hopefully end it. It can be hard dealing with bullies and giving kids advice on how to deal with it. The Kids Health article gave a few words of advice to give your kids. One of their strategies is to simply and calmly tell the bully to stop and walk away. Bullies thrive off of your reactions, so telling your children to not react, ignore them, and even play on their phone while the bully is trying to get to them can help. The bully will eventually get bored and stop bothering them.

There are many different ways to dealing with a bully, and hopefully your children never have to worry about it. But knowing how to deal with bullies and help your children deal with bullies can help make it easier. Your children may want to try getting the bully to stop on their own before you go to the principal, let them try one of these methods and if nothing changes, then seek additional help.

At Resurrection Christian School, we work to keep our community and students caring and supportive. We do not tolerate bullying but know that it happens, that is why we wanted to give parents additional information on how to help your children deal with a bully. Learn more about our school and what we stand for today.

 


Helping Build Character in Kids

There is a quote from John Wooden that says, “The true test of a man’s character is what he does when no one is watching.”

Our character is who we are mentally and morally, it is how we act in different situations, the traits we carry with us throughout our lives, and something that can be learned. While your child may learn some of these positive character traits on their own, there are ways to teach them and help them develop these characteristics. Helping your child grow to be compassionate, peaceful, confident, responsible, and empathetic people is easier than you may think, but does take some work.

By teaching your child these traits and helping develop these characteristics, you can help them become the person you and God hope they become. You want your child to be caring, loving, and thoughtful. There are different ways to help your children develop these characteristics and grow with them, helping them be a caring person throughout their lives.

There are many important characteristics that we need to teach to our children and help them develop. We want them to be kind to those who need it, to be confident in their own abilities, and to stand up for what they know is right. At Resurrection Christian School, we encourage these character traits and push our students to build their character and work on these positive characteristics. Peers, staff, family, and everyone else your child is surrounded by can influence their character and who they become, but when your child is surrounded by a supportive, compassionate, and thoughtful atmosphere, they will be more likely to build and develop characteristics that help them become a good person.

There are many characteristics that we want to help our children develop. In this blog we will go over some of these character traits and how to teach your children about each, as well as how to help your child develop positive traits overall.

 

Kindness

Being kind can make all the difference in the world and teaching your child to be kind to everyone can help them to build friendships, to make a difference in their community, and can help spread the kindness. Overtime your child will understand what kindness looks like and how they can show kindness to others, but to get them to recognize this easier, iMom suggests giving them tasks that they can begin to recognize as kind. Tell your kids to find a person at recess or at lunch that is alone and ask them to eat or play with you. This can help a lonely child feel as though they belong and help your kid learn more about kindness and find other ways to be kind to others.

Volunteering can also help your children develop a kindness. They will be able to see the difference they can make and how their kindness can spread to others. Kindness and compassion are characteristics that everyone should develop and learn, and teaching your children at a young age can help to spread the love.

Responsibility

Teaching your children how to be responsible at a young age can help them throughout the rest of their lives. There is a lot to teach a child about responsibilities. Start by giving them chores around the house, have them clean up after themselves, help load the dishwasher, get their younger siblings a snack, and other small tasks. This can help them to realize that they will have to put others before themselves and their own wants. Teaching them responsibilities within the family will help them to understand their responsibilities within society as they get older as well.

 

You also must teach them how to take responsibility for their own actions and accept the consequences. Character Ed mentions that parents should never make excuses for their children’s behavior or shield them from the consequences. Children need to learn from their actions, take responsibility, and accept the consequences.

Manners

Teaching your child manners can help them to develop and grow into polite adults. Manners are an important things to teach your children. Teach them how to properly greet someone, the interrupting is rude, and how to act polite in public. Start by helping your little ones learn how to do polite introductions, with eye contact, a firm handshake, a smile, and a name. It is easy to be impolite when meeting someone for the first time and many adults to it all the time, even by accident.  Whether they have something on their mind, have had a bad day, or are rude by accident, it happens all the time. Teaching children how to be polite and working with them on it can help them to develop polite behaviors which they will hopefully use for years to come.

Patience

A patient child is not something we see often. Whether they are tagging along for a shopping trip, sitting through church with you, or waiting for you to catch up with your friend, kids are terrible at practicing patients. But patients is important and can help people throughout all of life. Teaching your child the importance of patience and how to be patient can help them develop this trait and carry it throughout the rest of their life. Challenge them to make it through a chopping trip without complaining. Allowing your child to doodle or participate in some other quiet activities while you are shopping or in church can help them stay distracted and quite so you can pay attention or finish shopping quickly. But as they grow older, teach them to be patient without a distraction.

There are many different character traits that you can teach your children to help them become a person with strong morals and compassion. Teaching your child these characteristics may be easier than you think, besides telling them to be kind to others, giving them responsibilities, and teaching them manners.

Lead By Example

As parents already know, children learn a lot by watching and observing the people around them. This could be you, their siblings, their friends, a teacher, or just other people in public. But since you are around your child a majority of the time, they will probably pick up more habits from you than anyone else. Make sure you are showing your character so that they know how they should act. If they see you lose your temper with a waitress for bringing the wrong food, they will think it is acceptable to treat others like that. They will see the way you act and follow your lead. Even if you tell them to act a certain way, they are more likely to copy your actions than listen to your words.

When you are out in public with them, think hard about how you are acting. Even if it means you have to refrain from speeding through a red light, stop yourself from shouting at the car in front of you, or control your emotions while standing in a long line. It is important to make sure you are being a good example for your child and showing what it means to have good character.

Challenge Their Morals

When you are teaching your child about morals and character, challenge them and make them think about what these things mean. Ask them why they acted a certain way and how they would feel if someone treated them like that. When they have a difficult choice to make ask them what they think the right choice is and why, let them explain their answer and then give them your opinion and talk about the other perspective. As you challenge them and force them to think about their moral choices and characteristics, they will be able to understand them better, why they matter, and what they choices we make can change how people see us.

Talk About Character

Even talking with your children about character and morals can help them understand them better and learn what is right. They will be able to hear your opinions, make their own, start to think about their own character and moral beliefs. While your young children may not be the ones you want to have this conversation with, your older kids are perfect to talk with. Have them tell you how they think they should act, what they believe is right, how they think they should treat others, and so on. Your older children will gain new insight from talking about this with you.

Helping your child build character can help them in every stage of life. They will learn how to be compassionate, kind, polite, patient, and so much more. They will understand how they should treat others and how they should respond in different situations. Building character may come naturally for some, but others need to learn how to be caring, kind, and honest. Your children will learn a lot from watching you, so make sure you stay true to your character and follow your moral compass and try to refrain from reacting negatively to situations

You children can also learn a lot about character and morals when they attend Resurrection Christian School. We push our students from elementary to high school to be more caring and kind to their peers, to be honest and patient, and to be polite and respectful to everyone they meet. Building character isn’t tough, but it is easy for someone to get it wrong. Contact us today to schedule a visit and learn more about our schools.

 

 

 


About Volunteer Vacations

Taking a family vacation is fun and exciting. It gives you time to bond with your kids and take a break from your hectic lives. Vacations can be full of adventure in a strange new place, or a relaxing break in a destination you head to every year. Whatever the case may be, it is about the time to start making plans.

You want to bring your children to a place that they will remember forever and that they will be able to experience a different culture. Many parents want their kids to see what it is like living in other places, to show them how great they actually have it. And we get that. Nowadays, people can lose sight of how lucky they are and have no idea how much they actually take for granted. That’s why we take our families on vacations to experience the world and the different lives that are lived daily.

But let’s take it one step further. Why just bring your family to a remote location to show them different cultures and place that may be less fortunate, when you can actually help out as well? Volunteer vacations are a great way to spend time vacations while also helping out different communities. These volunteer vacations can be anything from helping the environment and animals to teaching english or building houses.

A CNN article answers some questions you may have about volunteer vacations, offering a ton of information about this unique vacation. According to CNN, the best place to start for your volunteer vacation is idealist.org. This site can help you find the right vacation and nonprofit for you and your family. You can also try volunteerinternational.org. These sites can help you learn more about different communities that need help and could be the perfect volunteer vacation.

These vacations are fun and meaningful, helping to bring your family together while allowing you to give back to the community. You may be a family that gives back to your own community regularly, but there are so many communities throughout the world that need help and support. This is why volunteer vacations are the perfect option. Take a break from your regular life, visit a beautiful country with a unique culture, and help out different people around the world.

Some people may think it is strange, paying for a vacation to go and volunteer. While that is understandable, it is a great way to help out, give back to different communities, and visit a destination you have always wanted to go to. Think about it this way: you could either sit on the beach all day, or you could help teach English to children who will show so much appreciation and love for you.

There are many different vacation destinations that can include a unique volunteer opportunity. At Resurrection Christian School, we require our seniors to go on a mission trip, helping out in different communities, getting a taste of different cultures, and giving back to the world. We understand how important these mission trips are for different communities and how important they are to our students.

Having a family “mission trip” can offer many benefits, more than you may think. Some of the benefits include:

Bonding

Volunteering and helping others is a great way to bond as a  family. It can help you realize how lucky you all are and bring the entire family closer together. While kids often times don’t enjoy volunteering or helping out the community, as they begin to see the impact they are making they will realize how important this work is and how much it can truly help a community.

More Meaning in Vacation

While you can find a volunteer vacation just about anywhere, you will be able to feel good about it. Vacations are supposed to help you relax, but often times, vacation are spent doing absolutely nothing, making them hard to remember and pretty unexciting. Or they are the opposite. There are way too many plans to even enjoy your vacation—scuba diving, exploring the island, hang gliding, zip lining, a famous tour, the list goes on and on. These types of plans can be excessive and make the vacation more of a stress when it should be relaxing.

But spending a day or two out of your vacation volunteering can make a difference. This can give new meaning to your trip and allow you to enjoy it more. Spending a few days helping others will giving you vacations more of a purpose and help your family feel as though they are doing something important. You will still have time to relax and spend time as a family, but the volunteering can make it that much better.

Giving Back

There are many great reasons why a volunteer vacation is beneficial to your and your family. But having the ability to truly give back to the community and make a difference is a good enough reason to use your vacation to volunteer. When your family realizes that they can make a difference to a community, it may change the way you view vacations. It makes you think differently about spoiling yourself. It can help you see that you can help others while enjoying a vacation in a beautiful location.

A Different Perspective

Many vacationers spend the entire trip on the beach, in a resort, enjoying time with the family, time to unwind, and time to waste. But when you volunteer during your vacation, you get a completely different perspective. Your entire family will see what a country truly is like and be exposed to what is really going on. While resorts are all glamorous and beautiful, they may be a hidden gem on an island in need. Volunteer vacations can show your family what is truly going on in these places and allow you to help make it better. This type of vacation can give you all a different sense and allow you to get a different perspective of popular vacation destinations.

A volunteer vacation is a great way to spend a break enjoying family time, staying in a beautiful location, and giving back to the community. There are many different ways you can give back. Even here in Colorado, you have the opportunity to give back to the community while enjoying a break from work and school.

The Sierra Club

The Sierra Club in White River National Forest in Colorado gives you the opportunity to work on trails, create animal habitats, and preserve the environment right here in your backyard.

These are great types of vacations to bring your family on. They allow you to make a difference, spending quality time together, and gain a different perspective of the world. If you are planning a family vacation for you and your family this summer, think about experiencing a volunteer vacation, this could be a trip that changes your life and helps your children learn more about the world. At Resurrection Christian School, your children will take part in a mission trip that will allow them to gain experiences in different cultures and help out different communities. Contact us today to learn more about our school and our programs.