Homework Helper: Writing Practice Part II

Welcome back to our homework helper blog on writing practice! In our first blog, we covered some of the basics for the littlest writers. Until about first and the beginning of second grade, the biggest concerns for writing are simply knowing how to physically do it.

Later elementary, middle, and high school students are all working on the same things — they’re just getting increasingly more challenging and building on the same foundations. These writing tips from our private school will help your child be prepared for all sorts of writing formats down the road. Find out how you can help your child’s writing grow at home, and contact RCS to learn more about enrollment for preschool, kindergarten, elementary, middle, and high school!

Why Is Writing Practice Important?

Writing and math have two things in common: People think they’re either good or bad at it, and they plan on using it or never using it for the rest of their lives. But with both math and writing, we use these subjects all the time, which is why it’s important to learn the foundations and to feel confident in some of the basics.

Writing, in particular, is something that your child will do all throughout their life. Essays for classes that impact their GPA, college applications, cover letters, work reports — the list goes on. Our private middle school encourages writing practice now so that your child can be well prepared and knowledgeable for their future encounters with writing.

Ways to Help Your Child at Home

Whether they come home with a big assignment or you’ve noticed they haven’t gotten as good of grades in their writing report cards or assessments, there are plenty of ways to help your kiddo practice their writing skills outside of school.

Look Over Prompts

Nearly all writing assignments — even those in the professional setting — have some type of prompt. One of the most important parts of writing boils down to understanding exactly a prompt is looking for.

If your child has a paper to write for homework, look over the prompt with them and help them dissect it. Have them rewrite the prompt in their own words, so that they understand what it’s asking for. This is trickier than it seems, and requires a good deal of practice. Identify verbs and important keywords in each prompt, and practice on multiple occasions. Here’s an example:

“In Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, the author talks a lot about storms. Write a three-paragraph essay that points out at least two examples of storms taking place, and explains what these storms symbolize.”

Important keywords from the prompt:

  • Three-paragraph essay
  • Two examples of evidence
  • Symbolize
  • Storms

By dissecting the prompt, your child (and you) will have a clearer idea of what to base their writing off of.

Understand Writing Structure

Most essays are looking for an introductory paragraph that includes a thesis statement, a few body paragraphs (usually three for elementary and middle school grades) that provide evidence to support the thesis, and a closing paragraph that brings it back to the original thesis.

Looking over samples of essays in this format is a great way to get an idea of what works and doesn’t. Usually, your child’s teacher will include a rubric so you can also get an idea of what the final product should look like — feel free to ask for one if you don’t have access. By knowing what a paper or essay should look like, you can help your child format something similar.

On that note, it should be added that learning how to write thesis statements, find evidence, and connect it back to your writing in a cohesive manner is pretty challenging. Don’t let one bad grade knock your child (or yourself) down — use it as a learning tool and grow from there.

Understand Writing Types

Essays are one of the more formal types of writing, but at our private elementary, middle, and high school, your child will gain experience with many different types of writing. Poetry, limericks, haikus, song lyrics, fictional stories, and reports are just a few examples they’ll encounter.

By exposing your child to many different types of writing, they’ll become a more well-rounded writer. Switch up the books you read together at a young age — try poetry (“Inside Out And Back Again” is a great one), nonfiction books, fantasy stories, and everything in between. When your child can provide context to the writing task at hand, they’ll have a starting place and will be more ready to dive in.

Talk About Different Writers

If your child plays basketball, they undoubtedly know and talk about Stephen Curry and James Harden. If your child plays guitar, they know all about some of the great musicians of classic rock. We look to others for inspiration and motivation, and the same can and should be done for authors.

Talk with your kids about writers that they enjoy — has there ever been an author they’ve continued to be drawn to, or a series that they love? If so, what have they liked about the writing? By revealing the man or woman behind the curtain, your child can get a sense for writers that they love and aspire to emulate.

Practice Typing

Handwritten essays are going to one day be a thing of the past. It’s important for your child to know how to write clearly and concisely by hand, but it’s just as important — if not more — to practice typing skills.

There are countless programs available that can work to improve your child’s typing. From games online to software, it’s a good idea to start your elementary schooler out strong so that their typing skills are developed by the time they get to our private middle school and high school.

Set Goals

Here’s the tricky thing about writing — no piece of writing will ever feel perfect. It will never feel done, and even if you’re proud of it now, chances are you’ll look back on it months and years later and find so many mistakes. You’ll wonder why you ever thought it was even good (and that’s when you become a writer!).

Setting goals for writing is essential for helping your child at home. Even if they get a great grade on a paper, there’s always something that can be improved. Take the time to set some intentional goals with your child, and reflect back on them consistently. Here are a few goal ideas for you both to consider:

  • Improving my handwriting or typing (writing neater or typing faster/more efficiently).
  • Using a new word I’ve researched for every paper.
  • Raising my grade from a C to a B on my next writing assignment.
  • Reading more from different writers, and trying out different writing voices.

Not only should your child set goals, but you all should celebrate when those goals are met! This is a great way to continue developing writing skills, and to help children feel motivated to continue growing as a writer.

Enroll Your Child With RCS

One of the ultimate best ways to help your child succeed in writing is by enrolling them with our private school in Loveland. We are the academic path your child needs to thrive and flourish in their future. See why parents and kids love RCS, and contact us to begin the enrollment process today.


Helping Kids Love to Read

Reading is one of the most important skills a person can have. And yet, most people say they read four or less books per year.

A love for reading helps out in all school subjects and work — even math requires our literacy. When we love to read, we do it more, and we become more articulate, more imaginative, and happier. Every parent wants their kids to ditch the screens and instead turn the pages, but how can you make that happen?

Resurrection Christian School puts so much value on not only reading books, but developing a love for reading itself. Our private school in Loveland incorporates reading at all turns, but we know that most parents wish their child was reading more (and enjoyed doing so). We’ve compiled a list of ways you can help instill a love of reading in your household. Try these out, and contact RCS to find out more about enrollment!

Lead by Example

As Brené Brown says, “The question isn’t so much ‘are you parenting the right way?’ as it is ‘are you the adult you want your child to grow up to be?’” Kids pick up on everything that we do. If we want them to be kind, generous, and empathetic, we need to embody these very principles in our day-to-day life. The same goes for reading.

We know that, as a parent, you are beyond busy. You’re constantly swamped. But if even you can spend five minutes a day reading, or putting down your phone for a few minutes and swapping it out for a book instead, this sets a positive tone. It shows that you prioritize reading, and your kids will absolutely pick up on the example that you set.

Provide Books

You don’t have to own a personal library to help your child love reading. After all, books can be expensive, and not as worthy a purchase if only read once or hardly looked at at all. However, trips to the library or finding a book sale are excellent opportunities for your little one to start gaining exposure to reading.

Learn Your Child’s Interests

If your child is obsessed with tractors, they might not be as inclined to read a book about boats. This doesn’t mean you need to limit their reading experiences — being exposed to different materials is how we find out what we like! But it does mean that you should be mindful of what might pique your child’s interest and what might have them running off in the other direction.

Take time to discuss books that they (and you!) like to read. By creating a dialogue around reading, you’re establishing a culture where reading is the norm.

Motivate and Encourage

For some, reading comes easy. For most, reading is hard. Which is easier: letting your mind melt while scrolling through social media, or trying to concentrate on a complicated and lengthy biography? Even if we’re good readers, it doesn’t always mean we gravitate towards reading instead of an easier task. Our private school works with countless students who have the skills, but struggle with the focus and concentration that reading requires — it’s understandable, because reading is difficult!

Be transparent with your child. Talk to them about how reading is a challenge, but that’s part of the fun of it. Pushing yourself to become a better reader helps you improve in so many ways. Sometimes we read things that we fly through, other times it takes us weeks to work through a tough book. Always be a source of encouragement for your child, and let them know you’re proud of them for their perseverance.

In our next blog, we’ll cover a few more strategies to help encourage young readers. As challenging as reading can be, it’s one of the greatest experiences in the world, and it’s a joy that no one should be deprived of. Stay tuned for more tips from Resurrection Christian School in Loveland! Offering preschool, kindergarten, elementary, middle, and high school private education for families in the Northern Colorado area, you can find the academic and Christian experience you want your child to have at RCS. Read testimonials and contact us today to learn more about enrollment.


Educational Activities Over Holiday Break

The first week of the holidays, your family is likely rushing around trying to get everything set for Christmas. You’re cooking all the foods, meeting up with all the family, wrapping all the presents, and come Christmas Day, you just want to relax.

After the blur that is the Christmas season, however, you want your kids to do something engaging. You don’t want them spending the rest of their break on the iPad or on their phones or playing the XBox. Not only does this feel like a waste of time off, it makes getting back into school and routines more challenging. Our Christian school has some educational activities that your family to enjoy that are both enriching and fun, while still making time for relaxation.

Connecting as a family, resting, having fun, learning — that’s what break should be all about! Learn more from Resurrection Christian School, and look into preschool, elementary school, middle, and high school enrollment options for your child!

Visit a Museum

A day off makes for a delightful trip to a museum. In Colorado, we have so many amazing options for everyone in the family to enjoy. If you haven’t taken your family to the Denver Art Museum, it’s well worth a trip — they have countless kid-friendly activities that can be found around the museum. There’s also going to be a free day on January 5th!

The Fort Collins Museum of Discovery is an even closer option. While it’s a bit more catered to younger children (think fifth grade and below), there’s still something for everyone to enjoy. And don’t forget to check out the Loveland Museum website to find special events and exhibits that are happening close to home!

Check Out the Library

Getting some new books is an obvious perk of visiting the library. But the Loveland Public Library has tons going on, and all their events are free! There’s a Messy Arts event happening on December 22nd, and a science event on the 28th — ideal for some hands-on and enriching activities for your young ones! Check out their calendar to find more opportunities for your family. And back to our book comment, is there anything better than curling up with a good read in the middle of the day? We think not.

Go on a Literary Scavenger Hunt

Children learning their sight words and elementary-aged kids working on spelling and vocabulary can benefit from this one. Create a list of words that your kids need to find (completely fine to make different lists for each child), then walk around downtown Loveland or Fort Collins to try to find each word. Each time a word is found, kids should write down where they found it (good writing practice!) and can take a picture of it as well. This is a fun and unique way to grow literacy concepts, and a great way to get outside and explore over the holidays.

Have a Board Game Day

Board games are educational? You bet! There are so many educational benefits that come from playing a board game. Strategizing, critical thinking, logic and reasoning, these are just a few skills that are honed through board games. But to add onto that, essential math and literacy skills can be developed through specific board games. Bananagrams, Scrabble, and Boggle are great for word play. Yahtzee and Monopoly are excellent for working on addition and subtraction. You can never go wrong with a game of cards, either!

Get a new board game for the family for the holidays, and spend one of your days off playing. It beats everyone being on their phones or devices for a day, and it’s such a fun way to connect with your family.

If you’re worried about your competitive children getting upset and the game turning from a fun event to a hostile, tear-filled situation, find a collaborative game for everyone to play instead, try playing on teams, or have the classic rule: whoever wins has to clean everything up. It’s always a great opportunity to talk about being a good sport, regardless of if you win or lose.

Create a Lego Challenge

Who doesn’t love Legos? Legos, like board games, have a lot of intrinsic educational value. They require critical thinking, imagination, creativity, and a pretty solid understanding of structural engineering. However, you can create challenges that incorporate STEM activities for something different for your child to try. Here are just a few ideas:

 

  • Tallest Tower: With an unlimited number of Legos, encourage your children to make the tallest tower they can — with the rule that their tower must be able to withstand an earthquake (shaking the table). After they’re finished, talk with them about how this rule impacted their design.

 

  • Identical Housing: With an unlimited number of Legos, the challenge is to create identical housing for two Lego families (though the colors of the blocks can be different). It’s more challenging than you might think! An added layer would be giving a limited number of Legos, which makes it more tricky to figure out.
  • Road Runners: Create a vehicle (with wheels) with the goal of having it travel as far as it possibly can. Looking for something more imaginative? Encourage your children to create a mode of transportation that has yet to exist. Hover cars, rocket boats, the sky’s the limit!

 

 

Grow Some Plants

A sunny winter home is an excellent place for plants to blossom and grow. Taking a trip to your local gardening store can get your family set up with some seeds, soil, and planters. An afternoon spent preparing your potential garden is an exciting and invigorating activity that everyone will love. It’s also a gift that keeps on giving — tracking plant progress is an ongoing learning activity!

You can go for a flower garden, or if you’d like to create a fruit and vegetable garden in the summer, this is a great time to start seeding your plants. Talk with gardening experts at a store about what they recommend, and happy planting!

Revisit the Story of Christmas

Learning about the birth of Jesus is why this season exists in the first place, and it’s absolutely an educational activity. While at our Christian school, your child will spend time learning about this miraculous time, but it’s an excellent lesson to reinforce at home as well.

Leading up to Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, spend some time with your family talking about Jesus’ birth, revisit the relevant scripture, and think about some takeaway lessons for your family to practice in the coming holidays and new year — as one example, think about how Mary did not have a place to go, and find volunteer opportunities to help those who are also in need.

The holidays are a spectacular time, and when you can bring in some educational activities for your family, you will not only strengthen your connections by spending time together, but you’ll have a break that’s happier and more fulfilling. Resurrection Christian School is all about having learning opportunities wherever you are, but we’re also about family time and getting to relax. With these activities, you’ll get all three. Have an amazing holiday season, and contact our Christian school in Loveland to schedule a tour!


Family New Year’s Resolutions

New Year’s Eve is exciting for many reasons, but one of the biggest reasons for this feeling of joy is the thought of a clean slate. A whole new and fresh year to make some changes in your life. A chance to reflect on the past year, and to create room for growth in the next one.

Whether you’re thinking about cutting out soda or desiring to show more patience to your family members, this is a great time to think about your goals as a whole. As 2 Timothy 1:7 says, “For God gave us a spirit not of fear but of power and love and self-control.” It’s almost like this verse was written with resolutions in mind!

Everyone should always have a personal idea of how they want to self-improve, but creating some family resolutions are an excellent way to connect with your loved ones and strengthen the bonds between you. Our private school has the inspiration you need to get started. Try out these family resolutions to ring in the new year in a positive, loving, and optimistic manner.

Choose kindness.

Let’s face it — the things that family members say to each other (siblings, we’re looking at you) are not always the kindest. Part of this just comes from being so close with one another. Since family is blood and they’re not going anywhere, it’s easier to say the first thing on each other’s minds from time to time.

But this can lead to hurt feelings and way too much conflict management/damage control. It’s also not living out God’s message. New Year’s is a great time to reflect as a family about some of the word choices that are being used, and how those can be improved.

It’s completely fine to start small. Think of one or two words or phrases in particular that you as a parent think should be eliminated from the household (and family vocabulary in general). Talk with everyone in the family about how you’re feeling, and start a dialogue on it — why is this word being used? Does it have a negative or positive implication?

In addition to thinking about words to exclude, your family can reflect on some phrases to include. Everyone could choose a day of the week to give some compliments to one person in the family, and it rotates each week for who’s in the spotlight. By making kindness transparent, talked about, and intentional, your family will absolutely feel the difference in dynamic.

Give back.

There are 8,760 hours in a year. It should be possible for everyone to give at least three of those hours to a volunteer opportunity. But when crazy schedules, school, sports, and everything else seem to make the year simply fly by, it’s difficult to add in another commitment to the agenda.

Make it easier for your family by starting out with the intention of everyone committing to a volunteer opportunity together. If you plan it at the beginning of the year, you have a better chance of having it on the calendar and making it a priority (just make sure you have reminders when the date gets close so you don’t forget, or suddenly remember when you’ve accidentally overbooked).

Jesus teaches us that giving to others and helping one another is one of the most important things we can do. Building this principle into your family helps build character, generosity, and selflessness — traits that everyone can continue to grow in.

Do less.

Raise your hand if you’ve ever felt overwhelmed by the number of things your family has going on. Now that everyone’s hands are in the air, let’s talk about why it’s time to do less.

From extracurriculars to sports to music lessons to dance class, there are so many things going on in your family’s life that there’s hardly a moment to just relax. It’s impossible to recharge if everyone is always busy. Our private school thinks you should make this the time of year that you commit to doing less, as impossible as it might sound.

Were there things last year you could cut out? Were there events or activities or things you agreed to be a part of, even though you didn’t want to? While obligations are sometimes unavoidable, no one should spend their precious free time (and it is precious) doing only what others are wanting. This means you can say no to some of the birthday parties, cookouts, etc. Even if your family makes a resolution of saying “no” to something just five times a year, this is five times as much recharging time as you had in the previous year.

Far too often, we think we have to be doing something. Your family should plan on having at least one weekend a month where no one’s going anywhere, and everyone’s hanging out. Rent a movie, stay in, read some books, make some homemade pizza, go for a short hike, but lay low. If doing less sounds impossible to your family, it’s a sign that you all need to do less.

Read more.

Reading is one of the most important things in a child’s development (and it’s an essential growth opportunity for adults as well). If your family is already quite the clan of bookworms, keep doing what you’re doing! But if your family has gravitated more towards screen time than reading time, it’s a good time to start thinking about a switch.

Your family can make a reading goal of how many books each person is going to read. Divide this up into quarters throughout the year (“By March, I will read _____ books”), then have a celebration every time you all meet your goals. Or, you can each make a list of books that you want to read during the year, and then have a family lunch where you chat about the books you’ve each been reading.

If you have very young children that still listen to you reading books aloud, keep doing this as well! Literacy skills are one of the most important things that a child can develop; they’re skills that impact a child in more ways than we can even imagine.

Resurrection Christian School in Loveland is a private school that thinks your family is simply incredible. You are the foundation for the students we work with, and when you can strengthen and build the connections and love with your family, everyone is impacted. Your children will be happier and more grounded, and more confident in their abilities and future. Spending time thinking about resolutions as a family is something that you won’t forget.

 

Interested in enrolling your child with the best private school in Northern Colorado? Resurrection Christian School offers preschool, elementary, middle, and high school to families in the Loveland area. Contact our school to schedule a tour today!


How Genes Affect Child Psychology

Parents are uniquely in-tune with their child in ways that science has yet to discover. While some might say that it takes a village to raise a child, recent studies on epigenetics suggest that there are some things that are out of the village’s control and more about the genes that could get modified without meddling with the genetic code. While there are plenty of factors that will affect development into adulthood, like going to private school or public school, there are other things that we won’t have control over that might come calling once your child reaches adulthood.

The Power of Genes

Science has proved that our genes rule us in many senses. For instance, the latest research on epigenetics has concluded that genes might be the cause behind childhood anxiety, a disorder that psychologists believe is the gateway to a child’s future mental ailments. Interestingly enough, research is actually leading us to believe that the real-time for epigenetic effects to take place will be at some time during the early childhood development periods. Supposedly, some environmental factors that a child is exposed to around a particularly susceptible age may go so far as to alter their genes. If you consider it, it’s actually an incredible evolutionary trick the body is playing, but how does that come to play in the modern era? Apparently, it can make you prone to a whole host of odd things like heart disease, cancer, mood or dietary disorders, infertility, suicidal thoughts and behavior, an addictive personality, learning defects and even something simple like a sleep disorder.

Where Epigenetics Begin

Some would assert that epigenetics start to develop as early as utero. If, for any reason, the pregnant woman is subjected to stress or even deprivation this can alter the actual genetic programming of the child that will eventually develop in their adult years. It usually develops in the sense that some genes get blocked, or rather, they cannot be accessed which causes future habits of depression, paranoia, and anxiety. Interestingly enough, these changes in genes are permanent and can be passed on to the next generation of children that never came across the similar stress or deprivation. If you observe epigenetic theory and the correlation of obesity, you’ll see that those prone to obesity may have undergone some stress of being an underfed fetus that was always hungry and striving for food. When food is available, the stress response that was created doesn’t shut itself off. Thus, people who are prone to obesity will have trouble feeling full and might be prone to emotional eating. In a sense, this is how people start to equate being chubby with an entire family because the gene anomaly is still present.

Epigenetics is the New Darwinism

Before the true study of epigenetics began, it was more widely accepted that Darwinism was the fashion in which organisms, especially humans, evolved and created long-lasting changes within the brain. With the continued study of epigenetics constantly expanding into other areas of human behavior prediction, it seems we’ve found a more likely culprit than an overly-simplified form of Darwinism. The worry that’s coming to light as we go further down the rabbit hole is whether or not the human brain has developed triggers for stresses that no longer exist and cause adverse effects now.

Where’s The Proof?

There are several, historical instances that have, unfortunately, proven quite a few of the previously stated hypothesis. One of the most prevalent and well-known examples of real-life epigenetics is the Dutch Hunger Winter. Studies conducted on the people whose mothers were starved while the affected child was in utero were extremely prone to obesity and, interestingly, schizophrenia. Another strange example includes the Great Chinese Famine that produced similar results in children who then became obese, with markedly impaired cognitive function and another uptick in schizophrenia. From this data, they found that of the children exposed to such starvation, women were far more likely to show the signs of schizophrenia than their male counterparts.

The Next Chapter of Epigenetic Study

Essentially, the only thing left to measure is what exactly affects the first trimester of pregnancy with notably terrible adult diseases and how far do these stresses carry into future generations. It’s safe to say that everyone’s ancestors experienced some sort of trauma, but has that affected our society today? Some hypothesize that the rise of mental illnesses could be attributed to that.

Give Your Child a Fighting Chance at Resurrection Christian School

With so many environmental factors that could alter how your child grows up, be sure to give them the best head start. By enrolling them in private schooling you’re committing to your child’s future success through more attentive, smaller classes and, because we’re a Christian academy, morals and ideals. Reach out to us to find out more about curriculum and enrollment opportunities for this coming year.


Furthering Your Private Education Outside of School

There are so many ways to raise a child and, as they say, “it takes a village.” Thus, pursuing educational activities that are still fun and enriching throughout the entirety of your summer is almost a necessity. Your private education for your child is a crucial piece of the kind of person your child will become so enhancing that platform for learning and enjoying scholarly pursuits outside of school can only help to capitalize on the fine work you’re already doing.

A Custom Curriculum

If your child is currently enrolled, or interested in enrolling in our high school curriculum it never hurts for them to show current interest in scholarly pursuits. While this project can be approached in various ways, we recommend encouraging inspirational tactics using a basis in core knowledge ideas, like something to do with history or literature. Pushing self-learning is a super healthy habit and it can only serve to make your child better suited in various areas of the workforce. If your student already enjoys history and literature, you might try introducing them to the local Hattie McDaniel home.

The Relevance of the House

Few people are familiar with who, exactly Hattie McDaniel is. In fact, she’s a very notable portion of the early Civil Rights movement. She played the iconic character Mammy in the Gone With the Wind film from 1939, which was long before MLK or any of the other civil revolutionaries got their start. As you’re probably aware of, Gone With the Wind is a stunningly introspective piece for its time full of feminist ideals as well as themes of equality and ridiculous nature of society itself. It’s a story of tenacious character and everlasting faith in yourself and it was controversial in the 30s when it was first published. The story itself continued it’s controversial reputation when Hattie McDaniel won the Oscar for her portrayal of the strong black woman that mentors Scarlett O’Hara throughout the course of the story. She was the first African-American to win an Oscar, and though segregation during that time was still absurdly powerful, she accepted the award with grace. She was forced to sit at the back of the audience instead of with the rest of the cast and was certainly the subject of much ridicule but faced the issue with her chin up and pride.

Forming the Curriculum Around Christian Academy Ideas

How does that lend to a curriculum? Have you read Gone With the Wind? It’s a meaty endeavor with most copies ringing in at somewhere past 1000 pages. It would take at least a whole summer to read, but that would be a summer full of introspection about the nature of youth prompted by Scarlett’s missteps. It’d be a summer full of reflection about the definition of race and how racism has changed and evolved over time. Capitalize on this piece of accessible history in town and turn a fun reading project into something you can touch and analyze.

Contact Resurrection Christian School

As educators, we take immense joy in finding historical relevance in the everyday things that you can ride your bike past on a day to day basis and reach out and touch. The lessons of history are more important today, in this tumultuous and confusing time, perhaps more than they ever have been. History has a knack for being uncannily timely and the Hattie McDaniels and her story are just an example of that. Contact us to start your private school journey with your child to open more doors for them and help us create the scholars of tomorrow. We’re eager to hear from you soon.


Creating Your Northern Colorado Summer Bucket List

If you recently relocated to Fort Collins in the winter or this less than lively spring, you have yet to experience the real Fort Collins. If you’re a local and you think the town has become boring and dried out, you’ve probably only touched the tip of the iceberg. Fort Collins and all of Northern Colorado is known for being multi-layered and brimming with culture and opportunities for adventure. If you’re worried about getting bored during the summer, never fret, for Resurrection Christian School has done the digging to find out the best ways to find wholesome entertainment that the whole family can enjoy. Start making a list, because we’ve collected a whole slew of activities, you may be hard-pressed to complete all of them, just because of the sheer number of them.

The Classic Day Trip

Every summer would not be complete without a day at the pool. City Park Pool offers a charming backdrop to your water adventures with slides and plenty of water features to play with all day. It’s a great way to thaw out from the winter and our stormy spring and get plenty of those rays to start that safe tan. The daily admission rings in at $7 for adults and only $6 for youths which they classify as anyone between 2 and 17. If you’re looking for something a little more exciting, pile into the car and head down to Denver’s Waterworld to take a spin on their water coaster. With two wave pools and quite a few animatronic enhanced water rides, you won’t know what boredom is.

Step Through a Time Warp

The Holiday Twin Drive-In is one of the only remaining drive-ins in the entire United States. It’s been apart of the community for over 50 years and it’s exactly as charming as you’d think. It’s cheaper than a regular theater and you can bring your own snacks without a problem. Get two still-in-theaters movies for only $7 per person, if you don’t have a hatchback, be sure to bring plenty of lawn chairs so you can stay comfy while watching.

Take a Spin on A Trolley

The trolley tracks you’ve seen throughout all of downtown Fort Collins used to act as the means of public transportation around the town. While it’s not the best option for getting into town anymore, it’s still totally charming and a really fun and relaxing ride. The car traversing the tracks now is a refurbished car from 1919 that runs around City Park and up Mountain Avenue, the beautiful street filled with old Victorian and modern homes with towering trees and lush green grass. It’s open from noon to 5 p.m on Saturdays and Sundays until September.

Are You A Dog Lover?

The City Park Pool hosts an event for pooches to take a dip in the pool in August. It’s known as the Pooch Plunge and is totally adorable and hilarious to watch the puppers play in the water together. Even if you don’t have a pup, it’s a great time to go and watch and then pet the puppies. Although, not everything can be a learning opportunity over the summer. Watching a graceful animal maneuver through the water. You could easily bring the conversation back to fluid dynamics in action which is always fascinating and enriching. If you attend Resurrection Christian School, you’re paying for the best private high school available and ensuring that scholarly conversation is a regular part of your day can only enhance your student’s learning experience even while on hiatus.

Enjoy Artisan Works

Jessup Farm used to be a fully working farm, now it’s a charming artisan village full of fun things to do. Though it’s origins are from 1957, Jessup Drive has been refurbished into a modern and vintage crossover that is super charming. It’s perfect for your mid-week summer days. Try out some of the pastries and coffee at the coffee shop and try shopping the tiny artisan shops or check out Jessup Farm Barrel House to try out some Funkwerks barrel aged and experimental beers. Although the kids can’t join in, they stock the brewery with plenty of games and activities for the kids and the fermentation sciences are always a fascinating topic of discussion that can only be fueled by Funkwerks innovation in their beers.

Try Out The Newest Summer Trend

While it’s always good to encourage intelligence based off of core knowledge, encouraging physical intelligence. Understanding how your body moves and works is a key portion to becoming a good athlete and developing healthy habits throughout life. Head up to Horsetooth Reservoir for some hiking and paddleboarding. Paddleboarding is a challenging and entertaining exercise that will teach how to control and move your body to improve balance. Discussing physics can only enrich the private education even while on hiatus.

Contact Resurrection Christian School

We proudly provide the high-quality, exclusive education that you always dreamed your child would have access to. As a private school, we ensure that the curriculum is enthralling and totally enriched with dynamic approaches that your child will remember. As educators, we understand how important it is to both give your child a great springboard so that they can advance to college and career prospects with ease, but also to raise a human being that society can be proud of. We’re ecstatic for the opportunity to help you mold your child and help them create skills that will last a lifetime. For mentorship of the youth is the most effective way we can change the world for the better.


Reinforcing Important Values During The Summer Months

If you have your child enrolled at our Christian school in Loveland, you get to enjoy the benefit of having important values reinforced daily in the classroom in your child’s life. Values — such as honesty, kindness, compassion, humility, and more — are all a major component of their day-to-day studies. When school lets out for the season, the emphasis on these values doesn’t need to stop.

Check out these tips, which will help you continue to reinforce important values in your child’s life during the busy summer months ahead.

It Starts With Your Example

If you want your kids to follow a certain set of values, you have to start by setting the right example. For instance, if you want your kids to value honesty, you should ensure you demonstrate this value in your day-to-day life. Make sure that what you do at work is done honestly. Show them that honesty is important by always dealing with them with integrity. If you lie to your boss or lie to a friend, your kids will see this and will follow suit. Kids are much more likely to listen to your actions than to your words.

Start each day by asking yourself what values you want your kids to take away from that day. Then keep those values top of mind while you go about the day. Use every chance you can to lead by example, instilling important values through your own actions. If you slip up and realize you did something that went against your values, don’t brush it under the rug. Use this as a teaching experience. Apologize to your kids for not setting the right example and make things right with anyone else involved. This will help your kids understand that everyone makes mistakes but it is how we handle those slip-ups that defines who we are.

Choose Clubs & Organizations In Line With Your Values

During the summer, your kids will benefit from joining different clubs and organizations. From summer sports to nature groups to other organized activities, make sure the groups they join help reinforce the values you want them to learn.

The right clubs and organizations will go a long way in helping instill the values you care about. For example, a sports team that emphasizes integrity in their actions will continue to teach your child about the importance of acting with character in any situation. Find groups that align with your values and sign your kids up for activities.

Take Time Together As A Family

While your example will be the number one way you express your values to your children, taking time to gather as a family and discuss important values is also meaningful. If you have a family meal once a day, use that time to talk about a different value each week. One week you might focus on the importance of kindness. You can encourage your kids at your daily family meal to talk about what kindness looks like, how it can be enacted, and how it can become a part of each family member’s character.

Make sure you open up these conversations for questions as well. If your kids have pushback about a value you present, don’t react with judgment and defensiveness. Instead, hear out what they have to say and allow them to ask questions. The only way a value will become their own is if they think it through and question it on their own.

Celebrate Wins

Finally, throughout the summer, take the time to celebrate times when your kids demonstrate a trait you value. For example, if your youngest took the time to share their new toy with a friend, celebrate as a family with a special treat and talk about how important kindness is and how they expressed that through their actions. Perhaps your teenager took the high road with friends and refused to take part in an activity that would have compromised their integrity. Celebrate with them by taking them out for a special meal one-on-one and reinforcing how proud you are of who they are becoming.

Positive reinforcement is the best way to continue to instill values in your children throughout the entire year. Just because the school season has concluded for the summer doesn’t mean learning should conclude as well. Here at Resurrection Christian School, we are passionate about passing on important values to your children when they attend our Christian school in Loveland. Learn more by booking a tour of our facilities today.